Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Staple theory and export-led growth: constructing differential growth

Contents:

Author Info

  • Morris Altman

Abstract

The staple theory is a subset of the export-led growth hypothesis, designed to explain the growth and economic development of resource-rich economies. It is a theory that has been misunderstood and is seen to be at odds with the stylised facts of economic growth and development as well as with mainstream neoclassical wisdom. This article presents a brief and critical historiography of the staple theory from which a simple model of staple growth and development is gleaned. As well, data are presented which suggest that staple theory remains an important analytical tool to help explain economic development and growth. Copyright Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd and the Economic History Society of Australia and New Zealand 2003.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/servlet/useragent?func=synergy&synergyAction=showTOC&journalCode=aehr&volume=43&issue=3&year=2003&part=null
File Function: link to full text
Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Economic History Society of Australia and New Zealand in its journal Australian Economic History Review.

Volume (Year): 43 (2003)
Issue (Month): 3 (November)
Pages: 230-255

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:bla:ozechr:v:43:y:2003:i:3:p:230-255

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=0004-8992
More information through EDIRC

Order Information:
Web: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/subs.asp?ref=0004-8992

Related research

Keywords:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Bassino, Jean-Pascal & Coclanis, Peter A., 2008. "Economic transformation and biological welfare in colonial Burma: Regional differentiation in the evolution of average height," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 6(2), pages 212-227, July.
  2. Nina Eisenmenger & Jesús Ramos Martín & Heinz Schandl, 2007. "Análisis del metabolismo energético y de materiales de Brasil, Chile y Venezuela," Revista Iberoamericana de Economía Ecológica, Red Iberoamericana de Economía Ecológica, vol. 6, pages 17-39.
  3. Szostak, Rick, 2006. "Economic history as it is and should be: Toward an open, honest, methodologically flexible, theoretically diverse, interdisciplinary exploration of the causes and consequences of economic growth," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 727-750, August.
  4. Nasri Harb, 2009. "Oil Exports, Non-Oil GDP, and Investment in the GCC Countries," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 13(4), pages 695-708, November.
  5. González, Germán & Viego, Valentina, 2009. "Argentina-Canada from 1870: Explaining the dynamics of divergence," MPRA Paper 18394, University Library of Munich, Germany.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:ozechr:v:43:y:2003:i:3:p:230-255. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.