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Inter-industry Wage Differences and Individual Heterogeneity

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Author Info

  • Alan Carruth
  • William Collier
  • Andy Dickerson

Abstract

Two well-established findings are apparent in the analyses of individual wage determination: cross-section wage equations can account for less than half of the variance in earnings and there are large and persistent inter-industry wage differentials. We explore these two empirical regularities using longitudinal data from the British Household Panel Survey (BHPS). We show that around 90% of the variation in earnings can be explained by observed and " unobserved" individual characteristics. However, small - but statistically significant - industry wage premia do remain, and there is also a role for a rich set of job and workplace controls. Copyright 2004 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Department of Economics, University of Oxford in its journal Oxford Bulletin of Economics & Statistics.

Volume (Year): 66 (2004)
Issue (Month): 5 (December)
Pages: 811-846

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Handle: RePEc:bla:obuest:v:66:y:2004:i:5:p:811-846

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Cited by:
  1. Philip Du Caju & François Rycx & Ilan Tojerow, 2008. "Rent-sharing and the cyclicality of wage differentials," DULBEA Working Papers 08-23.RS, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
  2. Robert Plasman & François Rycx & Ilan Tojerow, 2006. "Industry wage differentials, unobserved ability, and rent-sharing: evidence from matched employer-employee, 1992-2005," DULBEA Working Papers 06-14.RS, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
  3. Du Caju, Philip & Rycx, Francois & Tojerow, Ilan, 2011. "Wage Structure Effects of International Trade: Evidence from a Small Open Economy," IZA Discussion Papers 5597, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Robert Plasman & François Rycx & Ilan Tojerow, 2007. "Wage differentials in Belgium: the role of worker and employer characteristics," DULBEA Working Papers 07-12.RS, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
  5. Freguglia, Ricardo S. & Menezes, Naercio A., 2011. "Inter-regional Wage Differentials with Individual Heterogeneity: Evidence from Brazil," Insper Working Papers wpe_231, Insper Working Paper, Insper Instituto de Ensino e Pesquisa.
  6. Du Caju, Philip & Kátay, Gábor & Lamo, Ana & Nicolitsas, Daphne & Poelhekke, Steven, 2010. "Inter-industry wage differentials in EU countries: what do cross-country time varying data add to the picture?," Working Paper Series 1182, European Central Bank.
  7. Philip Du Caju & François Rycx & Ilan Tojerow, 2012. "Wage structure effects of international trade in a small open economy: The case of Belgium," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/138896, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
  8. repec:ese:iserwp:2009-13 is not listed on IDEAS
  9. Fernández, Rosa M. & Nordman, Christophe J., 2009. "Are there pecuniary compensations for working conditions?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 194-207, April.

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