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Gender and Racial Discrimination in Pay and Promotion for NHS Nurses

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  • Pudney, Stephen
  • Shields, Michael A

Abstract

For many years the NHS has been subject to allegations that gender and racial discrimination are a feature of the internal labour market for qualified nurses. This paper examines this issue with regard to the promotion process using 1994 survey data. We start by rejecting the assumption of covariate exogeneity inherent in the ordered probit model. A full simultaneous model is then developed which has important consequences for estimates of the influence of gender, ethnicity, training and career interruptions. We find evidence of significant differences in speed of promotion between gender and ethnic groups, which imply large differences in career earnings. Copyright 2000 by Blackwell Publishing Ltd

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Department of Economics, University of Oxford in its journal Oxford Bulletin of Economics & Statistics.

Volume (Year): 62 (2000)
Issue (Month): 0 (Special Issue Dec.)
Pages: 801-35

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Handle: RePEc:bla:obuest:v:62:y:2000:i:0:p:801-35

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References

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  1. Newey, Whitney K & Powell, James L & Walker, James R, 1990. "Semiparametric Estimation of Selection Models: Some Empirical Results," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 80(2), pages 324-28, May.
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  5. Blackaby, David H, et al, 1997. "A Picture of Male and Female Unemployment among Britain's Ethnic Minorities," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 44(2), pages 182-97, May.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Paul Frijters & Michael A. Shields & Nikolaos Theodoropoulos & Stephen Wheatley Price, 2004. "Testing For Employee Discrimination Using Matched Employer-Employee Data: Theory And Evidence," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series, The University of Melbourne 915, The University of Melbourne.
  2. Nathalie Havet, 2006. "La valorisation salariale et professionnelle de la formation en entreprise diffère-t-elle selon le sexe ? : l'exemple canadien," Post-Print, HAL halshs-00360079, HAL.
  3. Paul Frijters & Michael A. Shields & Stephen Wheatley Price, 2007. "Investigating the quitting decision of nurses: panel data evidence from the british national health service," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(1), pages 57-73.
  4. McNabb, Robert & Wass, Victoria, 2006. "Male-female earnings differentials among lawyers in Britain: a legacy of the law or a current practice?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 13(2), pages 219-235, April.
  5. Fertig, Michael & Schmidt, Christoph M., 2000. "Discretionary Measures of Active Labor Market Policy: The German Employment Promotion Reform in Perspective," IZA Discussion Papers 182, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  6. Shields, Michael & Ward-Warmedinger, Melanie, 2001. "Improving Nurse Retention in the National Health Service in England: The Impact of Job Satisfaction on Intentions to Quit," CEPR Discussion Papers, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers 2806, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  7. Prosper F. Bangwayo-Skeete & Precious Zikhali, 2011. "Social exclusion and labour market outcomes: evidence from Eastern Europe and Central Asia," International Journal of Development Issues, Emerald Group Publishing, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 10(3), pages 233-250, September.
  8. Chris Doucouliagos & Phillip Hone & Mehmet Ulubasoglu, 2006. "Discrimination, Peformance and Career Progression in Australian Public Sector Labor Markets," Economics Series 2006_07, Deakin University, Faculty of Business and Law, School of Accounting, Economics and Finance.
  9. Pedro Rosa Dias, 2010. "Modelling opportunity in health under partial observability of circumstances," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(3), pages 252-264.
  10. Paul Frijters & Michael A. Shields & Stephen Wheatley Price & Nikolaos Theodoropoulos, 2006. "Testing for Employee Discrimination in Britain using Matched Employer-Employee Data," University of Cyprus Working Papers in Economics, University of Cyprus Department of Economics 8-2006, University of Cyprus Department of Economics.
  11. Haile, Getinet Astatike, 2009. "Unhappy Working with Men? Workplace Gender Diversity and Employee Job-Related Well-Being in Britain: A WERS2004 Based Analysis," IZA Discussion Papers 4077, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  12. T. Kankaanranta & P. Rissanen, 2008. "Nurses’ intentions to leave nursing in Finland," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer, Springer, vol. 9(4), pages 333-342, November.
  13. Merlino, Luca Paolo, 2012. "Discrimination, technology and unemployment," Labour Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 557-567.
  14. Empar Pons Blasco & Luisa Escriche Bertolín, 2009. "Who moves up the career ladder? A model of gender differences in job promotion," Working Papers. Serie AD, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie) 2009-23, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).

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