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The Role of Career Choice in Understanding Job Mobility

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  • Ronni Pavan

Abstract

This paper presents a simple model that explains how the likelihood of job changes and their complexity changes over a worker's career, and the empirical work presented here uses the life cycle patterns of mobility and their complexity to infer the relative importance of firm-specific versus career-specific concerns as determinants of mobility decisions. The estimates of the model indicate that the contemporaneous presence of two quality matches, one career-specific and one firm-specific, is necessary to understand the patterns of the data. The model also predicts that the welfare losses implied by a disappearance of a career can be on average twice as large as the losses implied by a plant closure. Copyright 2010 CEIS, Fondazione Giacomo Brodolini and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by CEIS in its journal LABOUR.

Volume (Year): 24 (2010)
Issue (Month): 2 (06)
Pages: 107-127

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Handle: RePEc:bla:labour:v:24:y:2010:i:2:p:107-127

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Cited by:
  1. Aspen Gorry, 2012. "Experience and Worker Flows," 2012 Meeting Papers 154, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  2. Anne Gielen, 2013. "Repeated job quits: stepping stones or learning about quality?," IZA Journal of European Labor Studies, Springer, vol. 2(1), pages 1-22, December.
  3. Jason M. Fletcher & Jody L. Sindelar, 2009. "Estimating Causal Effects of Early Occupational Choice on Later Health: Evidence Using the PSID," NBER Working Papers 15256, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Jason Fletcher, 2012. "The Effects of First Occupation on Long Term Health Status: Evidence from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 33(1), pages 49-75, March.

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