Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Mutual Recognition Revisited: Misunderstandings, Inconsistencies, and a Suggested Reinterpretation

Contents:

Author Info

  • Wolfgang Kerber
  • Roger Van den Bergh

Abstract

The principle of mutual recognition is almost universally acclaimed for removing barriers to trade, for enabling regulatory competition, and for preserving scope for regulatory autonomy instead of embarking on a path to harmonisation and centralisation. By using economic theories of legal federalism and regulatory competition, this paper shows that mutual recognition leads to a number of inconsistencies, which question its suitability as a conflict of law rule that guarantees a stable allocation of regulatory powers within a two-level system of regulations. Mutual recognition should be understood more as a dynamic principle, which triggers a reallocation of regulatory powers between different jurisdictional levels. It leads either back to the country of destination principle, to a free market for regulations, or to harmonisation. The European experience suggests that a regime of mutual recognition is primarily another path to convergence and harmonisation, instead of being an instrument that preserves decentralised regulatory powers or even regulatory competition. The welfare gains from achieving market integration should be balanced against the welfare losses of an inefficient allocation of regulatory powers. Copyright 2008 The Authors. Journal compilation 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/links/doi/10.1111/j.1467-6435.2008.00412.x
File Function: link to full text
Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Wiley Blackwell in its journal Kyklos.

Volume (Year): 61 (2008)
Issue (Month): 3 (08)
Pages: 447-465

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:bla:kyklos:v:61:y:2008:i:3:p:447-465

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=0023-5962

Order Information:
Web: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/subs.asp?ref=0023-5962

Related research

Keywords:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Salmon, Pierre, 1987. "Decentralisation as an Incentive Scheme," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 3(2), pages 24-43, Summer.
  2. Siebert, Horst & Koop, Michael J., 1990. "Institutional competition: a concept for Europe?," Kiel Working Papers 440, Kiel Institute for the World Economy.
  3. Wallace E. Oates, 1999. "An Essay on Fiscal Federalism," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 37(3), pages 1120-1149, September.
  4. Lutz, Stefan, 1996. "Trade Effects of Minimum Quality Standards with and without Deterred Entry," CEPR Discussion Papers 1384, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  5. Sinn, Hans-Werner, 1997. "The selection principle and market failure in systems competition," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(2), pages 247-274, November.
  6. Klaus Heine & Wolfgang Kerber, 2002. "European Corporate Laws, Regulatory Competition and Path Dependence," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 13(1), pages 47-71, January.
  7. Justus Haucap & Christian Wey & Jens F. Barmbold, 1997. "Location Choice as a Signal for Product Quality: The Economics of 'Made in Germany'," Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics (JITE), Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 153(3), pages 510-, September.
  8. Wolfgang Kerber & Stefan Grundmann, 2006. "An optional European contract law code: Advantages and disadvantages," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 21(3), pages 215-236, May.
  9. Wolfgang Kerber & Oliver Budzinski, . "Towards a Differentiated Analysis of Competition of Competition Laws," German Working Papers in Law and Economics 2004-1-1090, Berkeley Electronic Press.
  10. Jeanne-Mey Sun & Jacques Pelkmans, 1995. "Regulatory Competition in the Single Market," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 33(1), pages 67-89, 03.
  11. Falvey, Rodney E, 1989. "Trade, Quality Reputations and Commercial Policy," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 30(3), pages 607-22, August.
  12. Van den Bergh, Roger, 2000. "Towards an Institutional Legal Framework for Regulatory Competition in Europe," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 53(4), pages 435-66.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Bianka Dettmer, 2012. "The European Union's service directive: Contrasting ex ante estimates with empirical evidence," Jena Economic Research Papers 2012-019, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Max-Planck-Institute of Economics.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:kyklos:v:61:y:2008:i:3:p:447-465. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.