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The Economics of Religious Participation: A Cross-Country Study

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  • Smith, Ian
  • Sawkins, John W
  • Seaman, Paul T

Abstract

Levels of participation in organized religion differ markedly across countries, a stylized fact which has resisted a general theoretical explanation. The claim of this paper is that the international variation in religious attendance can be understood in terms of systematic differences in socioeconomic variables. In particular, national religious participation is modeled as a function of investment in religious human capital, social interactions, and religious market structure. Using data for eighteen countries derived from the religious questionnaire of the International Social Survey Programme, the empirical significance of these variables is demonstrated by estimating simple regression equations. Copyright 1998 by WWZ and Helbing & Lichtenhahn Verlag AG

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Wiley Blackwell in its journal Kyklos.

Volume (Year): 51 (1998)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 25-43

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Handle: RePEc:bla:kyklos:v:51:y:1998:i:1:p:25-43

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Web page: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=0023-5962

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Cited by:
  1. Ian Smith & John Sawkins, 2003. "The economics of regional variation in religious attendance," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(14), pages 1577-1588.
  2. Benno Torgler, 2003. "The Importance of Faith: Tax Morale and Religiosity," CREMA Working Paper Series 2003-08, Center for Research in Economics, Management and the Arts (CREMA).
  3. Yazdani, Naveed & Mamoon, Dawood, 2012. "Economics, education and religion: can western theories be generalized across religions?," MPRA Paper 36793, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  4. Bruce Sacerdote & Edward L. Glaeser, 2001. "Education and Religion," NBER Working Papers 8080, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Brown, Sarah & Taylor, Karl, 2007. "Religion and education: Evidence from the National Child Development Study," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 63(3), pages 439-460, July.
  6. Cameron, Samuel, 1999. "Faith, frequency, and the allocation of time: a micro level study of religious capital and participation," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 439-456.
  7. Guido Heineck, 2001. "The Determinants of Church Attendance and Religious Human Capital in Germany: Evidence from Panel Data," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 263, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  8. Heineck, Guido, 2004. "Does religion influence the labor supply of married women in Germany?," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 307-328, July.
  9. Per-Ola Maneschiöld & Bengt Haraldsson, 2007. "Religious Norms and Labour Supply of Married Women in Sweden," Finnish Economic Papers, Finnish Economic Association, vol. 20(1), pages 41-56, Spring.
  10. Oliveira, Livio Luiz Soares de & Neto, Giácomo Balbinotto, 2013. "A teoria do mercado religioso : evidências empíricas da literatura
    [The theory of religious market : empirical evidence from the literature]
    ," MPRA Paper 51716, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  11. Salaber, Julie, 2013. "Religion and returns in Europe," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 149-160.
  12. Arano, Kathleen G. & Blair, Benjamin F., 2008. "Modeling religious behavior and economic outcome: Is the relationship bicausal?: Evidence from a survey of Mississippi households," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 37(5), pages 2043-2053, October.
  13. Hollander, Gideon & Kahana, Nava & Lecker, Tikva, 2003. "Religious and secular human capital: an economic model," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 32(5), pages 489-498, November.

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