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Staying together for the sake of the home?: house price shocks and partnership dissolution in the UK

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  • Helmut Rainer
  • Ian Smith

Abstract

The paper explores the importance of unanticipated house price shocks for marital dissolution in the UK by using individual household data from the British Household Panel Survey and county level house price data from the Halifax house price index. Results suggest that positive and negative house price shocks have asymmetric effects on the probability of partnership dissolution. Negative house price shocks significantly increase the risk of partnership dissolution, whereas positive house price shocks do not have a significant effect in general. The destabilizing effect of negative house price shocks is particularly pronounced for couples with dependent children, low family income and high mortgage debt. Results are robust to a wide variety of specifications. Copyright (c) 2010 Royal Statistical Society.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Royal Statistical Society in its journal Journal of the Royal Statistical Society: Series A (Statistics in Society).

Volume (Year): 173 (2010)
Issue (Month): 3 ()
Pages: 557-574

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Handle: RePEc:bla:jorssa:v:173:y:2010:i:3:p:557-574

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  1. John Muellbauer & Anthony Murphy & John Muellbauer, 2006. "Housing Market Dynamics and Regional Migration in Britain," Economics Series Working Papers 275, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
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As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Housing slumps increase divorce
    by chris dillow in Stumbling and Mumbling on 2008-09-16 12:03:50
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Cited by:
  1. Harminder Battu & Heather Brown & Miguel Costa-Gomes, 2013. "Not always for richer or poorer: The effects of income shocks and house price changes on marital dissolution," ERSA conference papers ersa13p250, European Regional Science Association.
  2. Clara Mulder, 2013. "Family dynamics and housing," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 29(14), pages 355-378, September.

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