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Bank Failure and Contagion Effects: Evidence from Hong Kong

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  • Gay, Gerald D
  • Timme, Stephen G
  • Yung, Kenneth
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    Abstract

    In this paper, the influence of three Hong Kong bank failures on stock prices of the colony's banking industry is examined. As deposit insurance is nonexistent in Hong Kong, the world's fourth-largest financial center, an interesting environment is provided for testing contagion effects of bank failure on other health financial institutions. By examining contagion effects in an environment void of explicit deposit insurance, this study should provide interesting insights into the resiliency of modern-day financial markets. In turn, insights should also be provided into debates concerning the role and reform of deposit insurance and the rationale for regulation of the financial services industry in general. The results indicate that unexpected bank failure causes significant negative stock price reactions within the banking industry; yet, some banks are less affected than others.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Southern Finance Association & Southwestern Finance Association in its journal Journal of Financial Research.

    Volume (Year): 14 (1991)
    Issue (Month): 2 (Summer)
    Pages: 155-65

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    Handle: RePEc:bla:jfnres:v:14:y:1991:i:2:p:155-65

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    Web page: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=0270-2592
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    Web page: http://www.southwesternfinance.org/
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    Cited by:
    1. Gropp, Reint & Moerman, Gerard, 2004. "Measurement of contagion in banks' equity prices," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 405-459, April.
    2. de Bandt, Olivier & Hartmann, Philipp, 2000. "Systemic Risk: A Survey," CEPR Discussion Papers 2634, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Akhigbe, Aigbe & Madura, Jeff, 2001. "Why do contagion effects vary among bank failures?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 25(4), pages 657-680, April.
    4. Luís M.S. Coelho & Ruben M.T. Peixinho & Siri Terjensen, 2011. "The intraindustry effects of going concern audit reports," CEFAGE-UE Working Papers 2011_23, University of Evora, CEFAGE-UE (Portugal).
    5. Brailsford, T.J. & Lin, Shu Ling & Penm, Jack H.W., 2006. "Conditional risk, return and contagion in the banking sector in asia," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 322-339, September.
    6. Nobuyoshi Yamori, 1999. "Stock Market Reaction to the Bank Liquidation in Japan: A Case for the Informational Effect Hypothesis," Journal of Financial Services Research, Springer, vol. 15(1), pages 57-68, February.
    7. Acharya, Viral V & Yorulmazer, Tanju, 2003. "Information Contagion and Inter-Bank Correlation in a Theory of Systemic Risk," CEPR Discussion Papers 3743, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    8. Luís M. S. Coelho & Rúben M. T. Peixinho & Siri Terjensen, 2012. "Going concern opinions are not bad news: Evidence from industry rivals," Working Papers Department of Economics 2012/16, ISEG - School of Economics and Management, Department of Economics, University of Lisbon.
    9. N. Kohers & T. Kohers, 2004. "Information sensitivity of high tech industries: evidence from merger announcements," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(7), pages 525-536.
    10. R. Elliott & Michael Highfield & Mark Schaub, 2006. "Contagion or Competition: Going Concern Audit Opinions for Real Estate Firms," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 32(4), pages 435-448, June.

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