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Explaining the Choice among Regulatory Plans in the U.S. Telecommunications Industry

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  • Donald, Stephen G
  • Sappington, David E M

Abstract

We investigate why different states in the United States choose different regulatory plans in their telecommunications industry. We present a simple theoretical model and an empirical analysis of the issue. We find that a state is more likely to replace rate-of-return regulation with incentive regulation when: (1) residential basic local service rates have historically been relatively high; (2) allowed earnings under rate-of-return regulation in the state have been either particularly high or particularly low; (3) the state's leaders tend to come from both major political parties, rather than from a single party; (4) the state's urban population is growing relatively rapidly; and (5) the bypass activity of competitors in the state is less pronounced. Copyright 1995 by MIT Press.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Wiley Blackwell in its journal Journal of Economics & Management Strategy.

Volume (Year): 4 (1995)
Issue (Month): 2 (Summer)
Pages: 237-65

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Handle: RePEc:bla:jemstr:v:4:y:1995:i:2:p:237-65

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Web page: http://www.kellogg.northwestern.edu/research/journals/JEMS/

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Web: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=1058-6407&site=1

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Cited by:
  1. Dewenter, Ralf & Kruse, Jörn, 2010. "Calling party pays or receiving party pays? The diffusion of mobile telephony with endogenous regulation," DICE Discussion Papers 10, Heinrich‐Heine‐Universität Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf Institute for Competition Economics (DICE).
  2. Gual Jordi & Trillas Francesc, 2006. "Telecommunications Policies: Measurement and Determinants," Review of Network Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 5(2), pages 1-24, June.
  3. Pérez Montes, Carlos, 2013. "Regulatory bias in the price structure of local telephone service," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 31(5), pages 462-476.
  4. Weisman, Dennis L., 2002. "Is there 'Hope' for price cap regulation?," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 14(3), pages 349-370, September.
  5. Wimmer, Bradley S. & Rosston, Gregory L., 2005. "Local telephone rate structures: before and after the Act," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 13-34, January.
  6. Toivanen, Otto, 2004. "Choosing Standards," Discussion Papers 937, The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy.

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