Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Migration And Agglomeration With Knowledge Spillovers

Contents:

Author Info

  • KYOKO HIROSE

Abstract

In this paper, a Grossman-Helpman-Romer-type endogenous growth model is developed with two regions in which there are mobile workers and linkage between consumption goods and differentiated intermediate goods. The economy has the potential to reach the following spatial configuration: full agglomeration, partial agglomeration, and segmented agglomeration. In perfect agglomeration, the innovation sector and intermediate goods sector agglomerate in one region. In partial agglomeration, intermediate goods firms partially agglomerate in the region where the innovation sector agglomerates perfectly. In segmented agglomeration, the innovation sector agglomerates in the region where both intermediate goods sector and final good sector do not agglomerate perfectly. In addition, we show the comparison of the welfare of skilled workers in each steady state. Not surprisingly, the welfare of the skilled in full agglomeration is always the highest. However, even though there are transportation costs of final good, the welfare in segmented agglomeration is not necessarily the lowest.

(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1468-5876.2008.00425.x
File Function: link to full text
Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Japanese Economic Association in its journal Japanese Economic Review.

Volume (Year): 59 (2008)
Issue (Month): 4 ()
Pages: 459-497

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:bla:jecrev:v:59:y:2008:i:4:p:459-497

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=1352-4739
More information through EDIRC

Order Information:
Web: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/subs.asp?ref=1352-4739

Related research

Keywords:

Other versions of this item:

Find related papers by JEL classification:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Picard, Pierre M. & Thisse, Jacques-Francois & Toulemonde, Eric, 2004. "Economic geography and the distribution of profits," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(1), pages 144-167, July.
  2. Diego Puga, 1996. "The Spread of Industry: Spatial Agglomeration in Economic Development," CEP Discussion Papers dp0279, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  3. Paul Krugman & Anthony J. Venables, 1995. "Globalization and the Inequality of Nations," NBER Working Papers 5098, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Baldwin, Richard & Martin, Philippe & Ottaviano, Gianmarco Ireo Paolo, 1998. "Global Income Divergence, Trade and Industrialization: The Geography of Growth Take-Offs," CEPR Discussion Papers 1803, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  5. Tomoya Mori & Alessandro Turrini, 2000. "Skills, Agglomeration and Segmentation," Development Working Papers 141, Centro Studi Luca d\'Agliano, University of Milano.
  6. repec:fth:iniesr:496 is not listed on IDEAS
  7. Krugman, Paul, 1991. "History versus Expectations," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 106(2), pages 651-67, May.
  8. Diego Puga, 1996. "The Rise and Fall of Regional Inequalities," CEP Discussion Papers dp0314, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  9. Romer, Paul M, 1990. "Endogenous Technological Change," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(5), pages S71-102, October.
  10. Fukao, Kyoji & Benabou, Roland, 1993. "History versus Expectations: A Comment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 108(2), pages 535-42, May.
  11. repec:fth:iniesr:430 is not listed on IDEAS
  12. Hanson, Gordon H, 1998. "North American Economic Integration and Industry Location," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 14(2), pages 30-44, Summer.
  13. Masahisa Fujita & Jacques-François Thisse, 2003. "Does Geographical Agglomeration Foster Economic Growth? And Who Gains and Loses from It?," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 54(2), pages 121-145.
  14. Yamamoto, Kazuhiro, 2003. "Agglomeration and growth with innovation in the intermediate goods sector," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 335-360, May.
  15. Audretsch, David B & Feldman, Maryann P, 1996. "R&D Spillovers and the Geography of Innovation and Production," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(3), pages 630-40, June.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Albert de Vaal & Tom Gosens, 2010. "Social Ties, Knowledge Spillovers and Regional Convergence," DEGIT Conference Papers c015_023, DEGIT, Dynamics, Economic Growth, and International Trade.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:jecrev:v:59:y:2008:i:4:p:459-497. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.