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Differential Employment Patterns for Citizens and Non-Citizens in Science and Engineering in the United States: Minting and Competitive Effects

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Author Info

  • Sharon G. Levin
  • Grant C. Black
  • Anne E. Winkler
  • Paula E. Stephan

Abstract

The consequences of the heavy inflow of foreign talent for U.S. scientists and engineers over the period 1973-1997 are examined using data from the Survey of Doctorate Recipients. Of particular interest is whether non-citizens trained in the United States have displaced citizens from jobs in science and engineering (S&E). Using a novel adaptation of the shift-share technique, it is shown that citizen S&E doctorates have fewer jobs in S&E and fewer academic jobs than their non-citizen counterparts for two reasons: the citizen doctoral population has experienced slower growth than the non-citizen doctoral population, and citizen S&E doctorates have been displaced. Whether the displacement observed was a voluntary response of citizens to the lure of better opportunities elsewhere or an involuntary response indicative of having been pushed out by foreign talent remains to be determined. Copyright 2004 Gatton College of Business and Economics, University of Kentucky..

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Gatton College of Business and Economics, University of Kentucky in its journal Growth and Change.

Volume (Year): 35 (2004)
Issue (Month): 4 ()
Pages: 456-475

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Handle: RePEc:bla:growch:v:35:y:2004:i:4:p:456-475

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Web page: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=0017-4815

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Cited by:
  1. George J. Borjas, 2006. "Immigration in High-Skill Labor Markets: The Impact of Foreign Students on the Earnings of Doctorates," NBER Working Papers 12085, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Kato, Takao & Sparber, Chad, 2011. "Quotas and Quality: The Effect of H-1B Visa Restrictions on the Pool of Prospective Undergraduate Students from Abroad," Working Papers 2011-02, Department of Economics, Colgate University.
  3. Peri, Giovanni & Sparber, Chad, 2010. "Highly-Educated Immigrants and Native Occupational Choice," Working Papers 2010-09, Department of Economics, Colgate University.
  4. Paula E. Stephan, 2010. "The "I"s Have It: Immigration and Innovation, the Perspective from Academe," Innovation Policy and the Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 10(1), pages 83 - 127.

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