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Unemployment Duration in Non-Metropolitan Labor Markets

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  • Bradford F. Mills

Abstract

Non-metropolitan areas of the U.S have experienced significant structural economic changes in recent decades. These changes have raised concerns that some non-metropolitan workers may face significant costs to employment displacements associated with economic adjustments. This paper explores the roles that linkages to metropolitan labor markets, area labor market conditions, and individual attributes play in determining the rates of exit from unemployment to employment among non-metropolitan area residents. Adjacency to a metropolitan area is found to significantly increase transition rates from unemployment to employment among displaced non-metropolitan workers, but local economic conditions are found to have relatively weak or insignificant effects on transition rates. Also, lack of post-high school education and minority status both significantly reduce rates of exit from unemployment in non-metropolitan areas following employmentdisplacement. Copyright 2001 Gatton College of Business and Economics, University of Kentucky.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Gatton College of Business and Economics, University of Kentucky in its journal Growth and Change.

Volume (Year): 32 (2001)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 174-192

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Handle: RePEc:bla:growch:v:32:y:2001:i:2:p:174-192

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Cited by:
  1. Bruce Weber & Mark Edwards & Greg Duncan, 2004. "Single Mother Work and Poverty under Welfare Reform: Are Policy Impacts Different in Rural Areas?," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 30(1), pages 31-51, Winter.
  2. Davis, Elizabeth E. & Bosley, Stacie A., 2005. "THE IMPACT OF THE 1990s ECONOMIC BOOM ON LESS-EDUCATED WORKERS IN RURAL AMERICA," Working Papers 18918, Oregon State University, Rural Poverty Research Center (RPRC).
  3. Partridge, Mark & Betz, Mike, 2012. "Country Road Take Me Home: Migration Patterns in the Appalachia America and Place-Based Policy," MPRA Paper 38293, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  4. Leigh Simmons & Elizabeth Dolan & Bonnie Braun, 2007. "Rhetoric and Reality of Economic Self-sufficiency Among Rural, Low-Income Mothers: A Longitudinal Study," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 28(3), pages 489-505, September.

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