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Macroeconomic News and Stock Returns in the United States and Germany

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  • Norbert Funke
  • Akimi Matsuda

Abstract

Using daily data for the January 1997 to June 2002 period, we analyze similarities and differences in the impact of macroeconomic news on stock returns in the United States and Germany. We consider 27 different types of news for the United States and 12 different types of news for Germany. For the United States, we present evidence for asymmetric reactions of stock prices to news. In a boom (recession) period, bad (good) news on GDP growth and unemployment or lower (higher) than expected interest rates may be good news for stock prices. In the period under consideration there is little evidence for asymmetric effects in Germany. However, in the case of Germany, international news appears at least as important as domestic news. There is no evidence that US stock prices are influenced by German news. The analysis of bi-hourly data for Germany confirms these results. Copyright Verein für Socialpolitik and Blackwell Publishing Ltd. 2006.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Verein für Socialpolitik in its journal German Economic Review.

Volume (Year): 7 (2006)
Issue (Month): (05)
Pages: 189-210

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Handle: RePEc:bla:germec:v:7:y:2006:i::p:189-210

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  1. McQueen, Grant & Roley, V Vance, 1993. "Stock Prices, News, and Business Conditions," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 6(3), pages 683-707.
  2. David M. Cutler & James M. Poterba & Lawrence H. Summers, 1988. "What Moves Stock Prices?," NBER Working Papers 2538, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Chen, Cathy W. S. & Chiang, Thomas C. & So, Mike K. P., 2003. "Asymmetrical reaction to US stock-return news: evidence from major stock markets based on a double-threshold model," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 55(5-6), pages 487-502.
  4. Pearce, Douglas K & Roley, V Vance, 1985. "Stock Prices and Economic News," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 58(1), pages 49-67, January.
  5. Hardouvelis, Gikas A., 1987. "Macroeconomic information and stock prices," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 39(2), pages 131-140, May.
  6. John H. Boyd & Jian Hu & Ravi Jagannathan, 2005. "The Stock Market's Reaction to Unemployment News: Why Bad News Is Usually Good for Stocks," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 60(2), pages 649-672, 04.
  7. Alan B. Krueger & Kenneth N. Forston, 2003. "Do Markets Respond More to More Reliable Labor Market Data? A Test of Market Rationality," Working Papers 114, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Center for Economic Policy Studies..
  8. Michael J. Fleming & Eli M. Remolona, 1999. "The term structure of announcement effects," Staff Reports 76, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  9. Rapach, David E., 2001. "Macro shocks and real stock prices," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 53(1), pages 5-26.
  10. Nelson, Daniel B, 1991. "Conditional Heteroskedasticity in Asset Returns: A New Approach," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 59(2), pages 347-70, March.
  11. Michael J. Fleming & Eli M. Remolona, 1999. "Price Formation and Liquidity in the U.S. Treasury Market: The Response to Public Information," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 54(5), pages 1901-1915, October.
  12. Zuliu Hu & Li Li, 1998. "Responses of the Stock Market to Macroeconomic Announcements Across Economic States," IMF Working Papers 98/79, International Monetary Fund.
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Cited by:
  1. Werner, Thomas & Stapf, Jelena, 2003. "How wacky is the DAX? The changing structure of German stock market volatility," Discussion Paper Series 1: Economic Studies 2003,18, Deutsche Bundesbank, Research Centre.
  2. Argentesi, Elena & Lütkepohl, Helmut & Motta, Massimo, 2006. "Acquisition of Information and Share Prices: An Empirical Investigation of Cognitive Dissonance," CEPR Discussion Papers 5912, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. M. Kabir Hassan & William J. Hippler III, 2013. "The Pronounced Impact of Macroeconomic Stress on the Financial Sector: Implications for Real Sector Growth," NFI Working Papers 2013-WP-01, Indiana State University, Scott College of Business, Networks Financial Institute.
  4. Alexandra Niessen, 2007. "Media Coverage and Macroeconomic Information Processing," SFB 649 Discussion Papers SFB649DP2007-011, Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.
  5. Imane El Ouadghiri & Valerie Mignon & Nicolas Boitout, 2014. "On the impact of macroeconomic news surprises on Treasury-bond yields," EconomiX Working Papers 2014-20, University of Paris West - Nanterre la Défense, EconomiX.
  6. Filbien, Jean-Yves & Labondance, Fabien, 2013. "Do financial markets learn from ECB monetary policy?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 120(2), pages 271-275.
  7. Díaz, Antonio & Jareño, Francisco, 2009. "Explanatory factors of the inflation news impact on stock returns by sector: The Spanish case," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 349-368, September.
  8. Wan, Yang & Clutter, Michael L. & Siry, Jacek P. & Mei, Bin, 2013. "Assessing the impact of macroeconomic news on the U.S. forest products industry portfolio across business cycles: 1963–2010," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 15-22.

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