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Regional Consumption Patterns in Australia: A System-Wide Analysis

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  • Selvanathan, Saroja

Abstract

This paper uses consumption data for eight commodity groups to present a systemwide analysis of consumption patterns in the six states of Australia. The author tests the hypotheses of demand homogeneity, Slutsky symmetry, and preference independence using Monte Carlo simulation techniques and finds general acceptance of these hypotheses for the six states. The paper also presents demand elasticities for the eight commodity groups in each state. The author finds, overall, food, clothing, and housi ng commodity groups are necessities while durables, medical care, transport, and miscellaneous groups are luxuries. He also finds evidence in support of similarity of consumption patterns across the six Australian states. Copyright 1991 by The Economic Society of Australia.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by The Economic Society of Australia in its journal The Economic Record.

Volume (Year): 67 (1991)
Issue (Month): 199 (December)
Pages: 339-45

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Handle: RePEc:bla:ecorec:v:67:y:1991:i:199:p:339-45

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Cited by:
  1. Brox, James A., 2003. "The impact of free trade with the United States on the pattern of Canadian consumer spending and savings," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 69-87, March.
  2. José A. Camacho Ballesta & Manuel Hernández Peinado, 2008. "Detección e influencia de los principales factores explicativos del consumo familiar de servicios en España y sus regiones," Revista de Estudios Regionales, Universidades Públicas de Andalucía, vol. 2, pages 185-209.
  3. Mehmet Ulubasoglu & Debdulal Mallick & Mokhtarul Wadud & Phillip Hone & Henry Haszler, 2010. "Food Demand Elasticities in Australia," Economics Series 2010_17, Deakin University, Faculty of Business and Law, School of Accounting, Economics and Finance.

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