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Immigrant Wage Adjustment in Australia: Cross Section and Time-Series Estimates

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  • Beggs, John J
  • Chapman, Bruce J

Abstract

Cross-sectional estimates of the comparative wage performance of natives and immigrants can be distorted if there are changes in labor-market quality between immigrant cohorts. This question is investigated with a study of 1973 and 1981 cross sections of Australian migrants. The authors find that migrants from non-English-speaking countries entering Australia about 1965 perform significantly better between 1973 and 1981 than predicted from the 1973 cross section. Migrants from English-speaking countries time-series wage performance is consistent with the 1973 cross-section prediction. The paper interprets the analytic importance of these results. Copyright 1988 by The Economic Society of Australia.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by The Economic Society of Australia in its journal The Economic Record.

Volume (Year): 64 (1988)
Issue (Month): 186 (September)
Pages: 161-67

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Handle: RePEc:bla:ecorec:v:64:y:1988:i:186:p:161-67

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Cited by:
  1. Daniel Parent & Christopher Worswick, 2004. "Immigrant Labour Market Performance and Skilled Immigrant Selection: The International Experience," CIRANO Project Reports 2004rp-07, CIRANO.
  2. Derek Hum & Wayne Simpson, 2002. "Analysis of the Performance of Immigrant Wages Using Panel Data," 10th International Conference on Panel Data, Berlin, July 5-6, 2002 C2-1, International Conferences on Panel Data.
  3. Winkelmann, Rainer, 2000. "Immigration Policies and their Impact: The Case of New Zealand and Australia," IZA Discussion Papers 169, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Paul W. Miller & Barry R. Chiswick, 2006. "Why is the Payoff to Schooling Smaller for Immigrants?," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 06-03, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
  5. Stephane Mahuteau & P.N.(Raja) Junankar, 2004. "Do Migrants get Good Jobs? New Migrant Settlement in Australia," Econometric Society 2004 Australasian Meetings 150, Econometric Society.
  6. Mosfequs Salehin & Robert Breunig, 2012. "The immigrant wage gap and assimilation in Australia: the impact of unobserved heterogeneity," CEPR Discussion Papers 661, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
  7. Prem Thapa, 2004. "On The Risk Of Unemployment: A Comparative Assessment of the Labour Market Success of Migrants in Australia," CEPR Discussion Papers 473, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
  8. Christian Dustmann, 1996. "The social assimilation of immigrants," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 9(1), pages 37-54, February.
  9. Prem Jung Thapa & Tue Gørgens, 2006. "A Duration Analysis of the Time Taken to Find the First Job for Newly Arrived Migrants in Australia," CEPR Discussion Papers 527, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
  10. Silke Uebelmesser, 2006. "To Go or Not to Go: Emigration from Germany," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 7, pages 211-231, 05.
  11. Vincent Law, 2011. "Welfare Policy and Labour Supply of Immigrants in Australia," Crawford School Research Papers 1109, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  12. Laurie Brown & Binod Nepal & Sarah Yu, 2012. "Supported accommodation options for people with disability: Investigating responses to the urban village concept," NATSEM Working Paper Series 12/16, University of Canberra, National Centre for Social and Economic Modelling.
  13. Christian Dustmann & Albrecht Glitz, 2011. "Migration and Education," Norface Discussion Paper Series 2011011, Norface Research Programme on Migration, Department of Economics, University College London.
  14. Cathy Gong & Rebecca Cassells & Marcia Keegan, 2011. "Understanding Life Satisfaction and the Education Puzzle in Australia: A profile from HILDA Wave 9," NATSEM Working Paper Series 11/12, University of Canberra, National Centre for Social and Economic Modelling.
  15. Dex S, 1992. "Costs of discriminating against migrant workers : an international review," ILO Working Papers 286940, International Labour Organization.

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