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The Demand for Australian Rules Football

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Author Info

  • Borland, Jeff

Abstract

An econometric analysis of the demand for Australian Rules football games is presented, us ing annual average attendance data for the years 1950-86. Increases i n admission prices had a significant negative effect on demand, and i ncreases in real income a positive impact. Among other variables of i mportance in explaining demand are lagged attendance and uncertainty of outcome. Copyright 1987 by The Economic Society of Australia.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by The Economic Society of Australia in its journal The Economic Record.

Volume (Year): 63 (1987)
Issue (Month): 182 (September)
Pages: 220-30

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Handle: RePEc:bla:ecorec:v:63:y:1987:i:182:p:220-30

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Cited by:
  1. Stephen Dobson & John Goddard & John Wilson, 2001. "League Structure and Match Attendances in English Rugby League," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(3), pages 335-351.
  2. Paresh Kumar Narayan & Russell Smyth, 2003. "Attendance and pricing at sporting events: empirical results from Granger Causality Tests for the Melbourne Cup," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(15), pages 1649-1657.
  3. Raul Caruso & Marco Di Domizio, 2012. "Domanda Di Calcio E Violenza Negli Stadi: Un’Analisi Panel Sulla Serie A," Rivista di Diritto ed Economia dello Sport, Centro di diritto e business dello Sport, vol. 8(2), pages 41-66, settembre.
  4. Stefano D'Addona & Axel Kind, 2011. "Forced Manager Turnovers In English Soccer Leagues: A Long-Term Perspective," Working Papers 1011, CREI Università degli Studi Roma Tre, revised 2011.
  5. Gielen, Anne & van Ours, Jan C, 2006. "Why Do Worker-Firm Matches Dissolve?," CEPR Discussion Papers 5739, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  6. Raul Caruso & Marco Di Domizio, 2012. "Hooliganism and demand for football in Italy. Evidence for the period 1962-2011," DISCE - Quaderni dell'Istituto di Politica Economica ispe0062, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Dipartimenti e Istituti di Scienze Economiche (DISCE).
  7. repec:ise:isegwp:wp372006 is not listed on IDEAS
  8. Coates, Dennis & Humphreys, Brad & Zhou, Li, 2012. "Outcome Uncertainty, Reference-Dependent Preferences and Live Game Attendance," Working Papers 2012-7, University of Alberta, Department of Economics.
  9. Caruso Raul & Di Domizio Marco, 2013. "Hooliganism and demand for football in Italy: Attendance and counter-violence policy evaluation," wp.comunite 0101, Department of Communication, University of Teramo.

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