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Inequality in the Early Cognitive Development of British Children in the 1970 Cohort

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  • Leon Feinstein

    (London School of Economics)

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    Abstract

    This paper develops an index of development for British children in the 1970 cohort, assessed at 22 months, 42 months, 5 years and 10 years. The score at 22 months predicts educational qualifications at age 26 and is related to family background. The children of educated or wealthy parents who scored poorly in the early tests had a tendency to catch up, whereas children of worse--off parents who scored poorly were extremely unlikely to catch up and are shown to be an at--risk group. There is no evidence that entry into schooling reverses this pattern. Copyright The London School of Economics and Political Science 2003

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by London School of Economics and Political Science in its journal Economica.

    Volume (Year): 70 (2003)
    Issue (Month): 277 (February)
    Pages: 73-97

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    Handle: RePEc:bla:econom:v:70:y:2003:i:277:p:73-97

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    Cited by:
    1. Doyle, Orla & Harmon, Colm P. & Heckman, James J. & Tremblay, Richard E., 2009. "Investing in early human development: Timing and economic efficiency," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 7(1), pages 1-6, March.
    2. Christina Paxson & Norbert Schady, 2005. "Cognitive Development Among Young Children in Ecuador: The Roles of Wealth, Health and Parenting," Working Papers 239, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Center for Health and Wellbeing..
    3. Borra, Cristina & Iacovou, Maria & Sevilla, Almudena, 2012. "The effect of breastfeeding on children's cognitive and noncognitive development," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 496-515.
    4. Jane Waldfogel, 2004. "Social Mobility, Life Chances, and the Early Years," CASE Papers 088, Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, LSE.
    5. Stephen Machin & Sandra McNally & Gill Wyness, 2013. "Education in a Devolved Scotland: A Quantitative Analysis," CEP Special Papers 30, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    6. Audrey Beck & Carlos González-Sancho, 2009. "Educational Assortative Mating and Children’s School Readiness," Working Papers 1142, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Center for Research on Child Wellbeing..
    7. Simon Burgess & Marcela Umaña-Aponte, 2011. "Raising your sights: the impact of friendship networks on educational aspirations," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 11/271, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    8. Emilia Del Bono & Marco Francesconi & Yvonne Kelly & Amanda Sacker, 2013. "Understanding the SES Gradient in Early Child Development: Maternal Work, Home Learning, and Child Care Decisions," Economics Discussion Papers 726, University of Essex, Department of Economics.
    9. repec:ese:iserwp:2012-26 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Ludger Woessmann, 2006. "Efficiency and Equity of European Education and Training Policies," CESifo Working Paper Series 1779, CESifo Group Munich.
    11. Michael Marmot & Ruth Bell & Angela Donkin & UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre, 2013. "Tackling Structural and Social Issues to Reduce Inequities in Children’s Outcomes in Low- to Middle-income Countries," Innocenti Discussion Papers indipa708, UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre.
    12. Stephen Gibbons & Sandra McNally, 2013. "The Effects of Resources Across School Phases: A Summary of Recent Evidence," CEP Discussion Papers dp1226, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    13. Elena Meschi & Anna Vignoles & Augustin de Coulon, 2008. "Parents Basic Skills and Childrens Cognitive Outcomes," CEE Discussion Papers 0104, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
    14. Jo Blanden, 2005. "Life Opportunities: The Evidence on the UK’s Declining Social Mobility," CEP Election Analysis Papers 004, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    15. John Jerrim & Anna Vignoles & Raghu Lingam & Angela Friend, 2013. "The socio-economic gradient in children's reading skills and the role of genetics," DoQSS Working Papers 13-10, Department of Quantitative Social Science - Institute of Education, University of London.
    16. Berridge, David, 2012. "Educating young people in care: What have we learned?," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 34(6), pages 1171-1175.
    17. Nicholas Barr, 2004. "Higher education funding," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 288, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    18. Delaney, Liam & Doyle, Orla, 2012. "Socioeconomic differences in early childhood time preferences," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 237-247.

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