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Do Peer Groups Matter? Peer Group versus Schooling Effects on Academic Attainment

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  • Donald Robertson

    (University of Cambridge)

  • James Symons

    (University College London)

Abstract

This paper estimates an educational production function. Educational attainment is a function of peer group, parental input and schooling. Conventional measures of school quality are not good predictors for academic attainment, once we control for peer group effects; parental qualities also have strong effects on academic attainment. This academic attainment is a then a key determinant of subsequent labour market success, as measured by earnings. The main methodological innovation in this paper is the nomination of a set of instruments, very broad regions of birth, which, as a whole, pass close scrutiny for validity and permit unbiased estimation of the production function. Copyright The London School of Economics and Political Science 2003

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by London School of Economics and Political Science in its journal Economica.

Volume (Year): 70 (2003)
Issue (Month): 277 (February)
Pages: 31-53

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Handle: RePEc:bla:econom:v:70:y:2003:i:277:p:31-53

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  1. Joseph G. Altonji & Thomas A. Dunn, 1995. "The Effects of School and Family Characteristics on the Return to Education," NBER Working Papers 5072, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Betts, Julian R, 1995. "Does School Quality Matter? Evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 77(2), pages 231-50, May.
  3. Donald Robertson & James Symons, 1996. "Self-Selection in The State School System," CEP Discussion Papers dp0312, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  4. Robertson, D. & Symons, J., 1988. "The Occupational Choice Of British Children," Papers 325, London School of Economics - Centre for Labour Economics.
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