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Occupational Downgrading and Upgrading in Britain

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  • Evans, Phil
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    Abstract

    The willingness of workers to move down an occupational hierarchy is a potentially important source of flexibility in the labor market. But, relatively little is known about the scale or pattern of occupational up- and downgrading. This paper examines who downgrades and the cyclical structure of up- and downgrading. The author finds that occupational downgrading is surprisingly large relative to flows into unemployment. Individuals who have a high payoff to skilled work, such as educated workers, are less likely to downgrade. Contrary to expectations, the rate of downgrading is found to be greater in the boom, while upgrading follows the more conventional expectation of also being procyclical. This finding is interpreted as evidence consistent with the rationing of jobs in the downgrading process, contrary to the assumptions of simple dual labor market models. Copyright 1999 by The London School of Economics and Political Science

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by London School of Economics and Political Science in its journal Economica.

    Volume (Year): 66 (1999)
    Issue (Month): 261 (February)
    Pages: 79-96

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    Handle: RePEc:bla:econom:v:66:y:1999:i:261:p:79-96

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    Cited by:
    1. Markus Gangl, 2000. "Education and Labour Market Entry across Europe : The Impact of Institutional Arrangements in Training Systems and Labour Markets," MZES Working Papers 25, MZES.
    2. Jun Han & Wing Suen, 2011. "Age structure of the workforce in growing and declining industries: evidence from Hong Kong," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 24(1), pages 167-189, January.
    3. Crespo, Nuno & Simoes, Nadia & Moreira, Sandrina B., 2013. "Gender Differences in Occupational Mobility – Evidence from Portugal," MPRA Paper 49195, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Meng, Xin & Junankar, Pramod N. (Raja) & Kapuscinski, Cezary A., 2004. "Job Mobility along the Technological Ladder: A Case Study of Australia," IZA Discussion Papers 1169, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Humburg Martin & Grip Andries de & Velden Rolf van der, 2012. "Which skills protect graduates against a slack labour market?," Research Memorandum 002, Maastricht University, Maastricht Research School of Economics of Technology and Organization (METEOR).
    6. Humburg Martin & Grip Andries de & Velden Rolf van der, 2012. "Which skills protect graduates against a slack labour market?," ROA Research Memorandum 001, Maastricht University, Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA).
    7. Kiersztyn, Anna, 2013. "Stuck in a mismatch? The persistence of overeducation during twenty years of the post-communist transition in Poland," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 78-91.

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