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Excess Labour and the Business Cycle: A Comparative Study of Japan, Germany, the United Kingdom and the United States

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  • Hart, Robert A
  • Malley, Jim

Abstract

Against the background of firm-specific human capital theory, this paper investigates empirically the relative propensity of manufacturing industries in Japan, Germany, the United Kingdom, and the United States to hold excess labor over the business cycle. Both stock and utilization dimensions of the labor input are integrated into the study. Throughout, discussion is linked to earlier research that has analyzed the relative international performance of the Japanese labor market. Copyright 1996 by The London School of Economics and Political Science.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by London School of Economics and Political Science in its journal Economica.

Volume (Year): 63 (1996)
Issue (Month): 250 (May)
Pages: 325-42

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Handle: RePEc:bla:econom:v:63:y:1996:i:250:p:325-42

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Cited by:
  1. Inklaar, Robert, 2006. "Cyclical Productivity in Europe and the United States, Evaluating the Evidence on Returns to Scale and Input Utilization," CEPR Discussion Papers 5501, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Stuart Glosser & Lonnie Golden, 2005. "Is labour becoming more or less flexible? Changing dynamic behaviour and asymmetries of labour input in US manufacturing," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 29(4), pages 535-557, July.
  3. J Malley & V A Muscatelli., . "Business Cycles and Productivity Growth: Are Temporary Downturns Productive or Wasteful?," Working Papers 9605, Business School - Economics, University of Glasgow.
  4. Andrew Hildreth and Fumio Ohtake, . "Labor Demand and the Structure of Adjustment Costs in Japan," Economics Discussion Papers 469, University of Essex, Department of Economics.
  5. Julia Darby & Robert A Hart & Michaela Vecchi, 1998. "Labour Force Participation and the Business Cycle: A Comparative Analysis of Europe, Japan and the United States," Working Papers 9802, Business School - Economics, University of Glasgow.
  6. Robert A. Hart & J Malley (University of Glasgow), 1996. "Labor Productivity and the Cycle," Working Papers 9613, Business School - Economics, University of Glasgow.
  7. Mollick, Andre Varella, 2004. "Production smoothing in the Japanese vehicle industry," International Journal of Production Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(1), pages 63-74, September.
  8. Darby, Julia & Hart, Robert A. & Vecchi, Michela, 2001. "Labour force participation and the business cycle: a comparative analysis of France, Japan, Sweden and the United States," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 13(2), pages 113-133, April.

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