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Where Have Two Million Trade Union Members Gone?

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  • Carruth, Alan A
  • Disney, Richard F

Abstract

This paper presents an econometric model of trade-union membership in the United Kingdom. The empirical model utilizes cyclical variables in the explanation of membership changes, and separates the short- and long-run dynamics explicitly. It proves to be a superior specification to previous "business cycle" models estimated for the United Kingdom and predicts satisfatorily the recent decline in membership. The inclusion of a dummy variable reflecting the political complexion of the government is the only secular variable which significantly improves equation performance, but the composition of changes in employment plays no part in explaining the recent decline in membership. Copyright 1988 by The London School of Economics and Political Science.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by London School of Economics and Political Science in its journal Economica.

Volume (Year): 55 (1988)
Issue (Month): 217 (February)
Pages: 1-19

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Handle: RePEc:bla:econom:v:55:y:1988:i:217:p:1-19

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Cited by:
  1. Blanchflower, David G., 2006. "A Cross-Country Study of Union Membership," IZA Discussion Papers 2016, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Dittrich, Marcus & Schirwitz, Beate, 2011. "Union membership and employment dynamics: A note," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 110(1), pages 38-40, January.
  3. David Metcalf, 2001. "British unions: dissolution or resurgence revisited," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 20124, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  4. Miller, Paul & Mulvey, Charles, 1993. "What Do Australians Unions Do?," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 69(206), pages 315-42, September.
  5. Andy Charlwood, 2003. "The anatomy of union decline in Britain: 1990-1998," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 20006, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  6. Schnabel, Claus, 2012. "Union membership and density: Some (not so) stylized facts and challenges," Discussion Papers 81, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Chair of Labour and Regional Economics.
  7. Alex Bryson & Rafael Gomez, 2003. "Why Have Workers Stopped Joining Unions?," CEP Discussion Papers dp0589, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  8. S. Milner & G. Nombela, 1995. "Trade union strength," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 20702, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  9. A Charlwood, 2003. "The Anatomy of Union Decline in Britain: 1990-1998," CEP Discussion Papers dp0601, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  10. Daniele Checchi & Claudio Lucifora, 2002. "Unions and labour market institutions in Europe," Departmental Working Papers 2002-16, Department of Economics, Management and Quantitative Methods at Università degli Studi di Milano.
  11. David Metcalf, 1993. "Transformation of British Industrial Relations? Institutions, Conduct and Outcomes 1980-1990," CEP Discussion Papers dp0151, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  12. Daniele Checchi, 2000. "Time series evidence on union densities in European countries," Departmental Working Papers 2000-10, Department of Economics, Management and Quantitative Methods at Università degli Studi di Milano.
  13. Ours, J.C., 1991. "Union growth in The Netherlands 1961-1989," Serie Research Memoranda 0033, VU University Amsterdam, Faculty of Economics, Business Administration and Econometrics.
  14. David Metcalf, 1993. "Transformation of British industrial relations? Institutions, conduct and outcomes 1980-1990," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 20981, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  15. Schnabel, Claus, 2002. "Determinants of trade union membership," Discussion Papers 15, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Chair of Labour and Regional Economics.
  16. Berlemann, Michael & Zimmermann, Klaus W., 2010. "They don't get me I'm part of the union: Trade unions in the German parliament," HWWI Research Papers 2-16, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWI).
  17. Bruno Chiarini & Massimo Giannini, 2000. "A Model Of Union Behaviour And Benefits Under Uncertainty - Did Thatcher'S Benefits Policy Increase Employment And Reduce Union Power?," Working Papers 5_2000, D.E.S. (Department of Economic Studies), University of Naples "Parthenope", Italy.

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