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The Effects Of Spanish-Language Background On Completed Schooling And Aptitude Test Scores

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  • LUIS LOCAY
  • TRACY L. REGAN
  • ARTHUR M. DIAMOND Jr

Abstract

We investigate the e ect of speaking Spanish at home as a child on completed schooling and aptitude test scores using data on Hispanics who grew up in the U.S. from the NLSY79. We model the accumulation of traditional human capital and English uency, leading to the joint determination of schooling and test scores. We nd that speaking Spanish at home reduces test scores but has no signi cant e ect on completed schooling. The reduction in test scores is more dramatic the higher the education of the parents and when the choice of home language is endogenous.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.1465-7295.2012.00458.x
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Western Economic Association International in its journal Economic Inquiry.

Volume (Year): 51 (2013)
Issue (Month): 1 (01)
Pages: 527-562

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Handle: RePEc:bla:ecinqu:v:51:y:2013:i:1:p:527-562

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