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The Role of Migrant Networks in Labor Migration: The Case of China

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  • Yaohui Zhao
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    Abstract

    Using recent household survey data from rural China, this article investigates determinants of labor migration, paying special attention to the role of migrant networks. Migrant networks are measured by the number of early migrants from the village, comprised of experienced migrants who continue their migratory activities and return migrants. Observations of early migrants are excluded from regression analyses to enable identification. Results show that experienced migrants have a positive and significant effect on subsequent migration, but return migrants do not. This implies that migrant networks are important, and their effects materialize through practical assistance in the process of migration. (JEL "J61", "O15", "Z13") Copyright 2003 Western Economic Association International.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Western Economic Association International in its journal Contemporary Economic Policy.

    Volume (Year): 21 (2003)
    Issue (Month): 4 (October)
    Pages: 500-511

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    Handle: RePEc:bla:coecpo:v:21:y:2003:i:4:p:500-511

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    Cited by:
    1. Yuyu Chen & Ginger Zhe Jin & Yang Yue, 2010. "Peer Migration in China," NBER Working Papers 15671, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Zhao, Qiran & Yu, Xiaohua & Wang, Xiaobing & Glauben, Thomas, 2012. "The impact of parental migration on children’s school performance in rural China," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil, International Association of Agricultural Economists 126460, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    3. Wang, Xiaobing, 2007. "Labor market behavior of Chinese rural households during transition," Studies on the Agricultural and Food Sector in Central and Eastern Europe, Leib­niz Institute of Agricultural Development in Central and Eastern Europe (IAMO), volume 42, number 92321.
    4. Sylvie Démurger, 2012. "Mapping Modes of Rural Labour Migration in China," Working Papers, Groupe d'Analyse et de Théorie Economique (GATE), Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS), Université Lyon 2, Ecole Normale Supérieure 1209, Groupe d'Analyse et de Théorie Economique (GATE), Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS), Université Lyon 2, Ecole Normale Supérieure.
    5. Giulietti, Corrado & Wahba, Jackline & Zenou, Yves, 2014. "Strong versus Weak Ties in Migration," IZA Discussion Papers 8089, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Du, Yang & Park, Albert & Wang, Sangui, 2005. "Migration and rural poverty in China," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 688-709, December.
    7. Feng Hu, 2013. "Does migration benefit the schooling of children left behind?," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 29(2), pages 33-70, July.
    8. Zhao Chen & Shiqing Jiang & Ming Lu & Hiroshi Sato, 2008. "How Do Heterogeneous Social Interactions Affect the Peer Effect in Rural-Urban Migration?: Empirical Evidence from China," Global COE Hi-Stat Discussion Paper Series, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University gd08-008, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    9. Li Hao & Daniel Houser & Lei Mao & Marie Claire Villeval, 2014. "A Field Study of Chinese Migrant Workers’ Attitudes toward Risks, Strategic Uncertainty, and Competitiveness," Working Papers, Groupe d'Analyse et de Théorie Economique (GATE), Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS), Université Lyon 2, Ecole Normale Supérieure 1418, Groupe d'Analyse et de Théorie Economique (GATE), Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS), Université Lyon 2, Ecole Normale Supérieure.
    10. de Brauw, Alan & Giles, John, 2008. "Migrant labor markets and the welfare of rural households in the developing world : evidence from China," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4585, The World Bank.
    11. SHI, Xiaoping & Heerink, Nico & Qu, Futian, 2007. "Choices between different off-farm employment sub-categories: An empirical analysis for Jiangxi Province, China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 438-455.
    12. Zhang, Guibin, 2008. "The choice of formal or informal finance: Evidence from Chengdu, China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 659-678, December.
    13. Yuying Tong & Martin Piotrowski, 2012. "Migration and Health Selectivity in the Context of Internal Migration in China, 1997–2009," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer, Springer, vol. 31(4), pages 497-543, August.
    14. Chad Meyerhoefer & C. Chen, 2011. "The effect of parental labor migration on children’s educational progress in rural china," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, Springer, vol. 9(3), pages 379-396, September.
    15. Andrea Cutillo & Claudio Ceccarelli, 2010. "The internal relocation premium: are migrants positively or negatively selected? Evidence from Italy," Working Papers, University of Rome La Sapienza, Department of Public Economics 137, University of Rome La Sapienza, Department of Public Economics.
    16. Fu, Yuming & Gabriel, Stuart A., 2012. "Labor migration, human capital agglomeration and regional development in China," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 42(3), pages 473-484.
    17. Bodvarsson, Örn B. & Hou, Jack W. & Shen, Kailing, 2014. "Aging and Migration in a Transition Economy: The Case of China," IZA Discussion Papers 8351, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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