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A Siblings Analysis Of The Effects Of Alcohol Consumption Onset On Educational Attainment

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  • SF Koch
  • DC Ribar

Abstract

This article examines the relationship between youthful drinking and educational attainment using data on same-sex siblings pairs from the 1979-90 panels of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. We consider different estimators that can be constructed using siblings data, including estimators that adopt key restrictions of the standard regression, family fixed effect, and instrumental variable approaches. We also consider the properties of these estimators under more general conditions and show that under very plausible assumptions the effect of drinking on schooling can be bounded. The study finds that estimates of the schooling consequences of youthful drinking are very sensitive to specification issues. The research concludes that the actual effects of youthful drinking on education are likely to be small. Copyright 2001 Western Economic Association International.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Western Economic Association International in its journal Contemporary Economic Policy.

Volume (Year): 19 (2001)
Issue (Month): 2 (04)
Pages: 162-174

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Handle: RePEc:bla:coecpo:v:19:y:2001:i:2:p:162-174

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Cited by:
  1. Pinka Chatterji & Jeffrey DeSimone, 2006. "High School Alcohol Use and Young Adult Labor Market Outcomes," NBER Working Papers 12529, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Jeff DeSimone & Amy M. Wolaver, 2005. "Drinking and Academic Performance in High School," NBER Working Papers 11035, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Lisa Powell & Jenny Williams & Henry Wechsler, 2004. "Study habits and the level of alcohol use among college students," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(2), pages 135-149.
  4. Zhao, Meng & Konishi, Yoshifumi & Glewwe, Paul, 2012. "Does smoking affect schooling? Evidence from teenagers in rural China," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 31(4), pages 584-598.
  5. Pinka Chatterji, 2003. "Illicit Drug Use and Educational Attainment," NBER Working Papers 10045, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Balsa, Ana I. & Giuliano, Laura M. & French, Michael T., 2011. "The effects of alcohol use on academic achievement in high school," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 1-15, February.
  7. Renna, Francesco, 2008. "Teens' alcohol consumption and schooling," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 69-78, February.
  8. Chatterji, Pinka, 2006. "Does alcohol use during high school affect educational attainment?: Evidence from the National Education Longitudinal Study," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 25(5), pages 482-497, October.
  9. Sabia, Joseph J. & Rees, Daniel I., 2011. "Individual heterogeneity and reverse causality in the relationship between migraine headache and educational attainment," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 913-923, October.
  10. Pinka Chatterji & Jeff DeSimone, 2005. "Adolescent Drinking and High School Dropout," NBER Working Papers 11337, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Michael T. French & Johanna C. Maclean, 2006. "Underage alcohol use, delinquency, and criminal activity," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(12), pages 1261-1281.
  12. Daniel F. McCaffrey & Rosalie Liccardo Pacula & Bing Han & Phyllis Ellickson, 2010. "Marijuana use and high school dropout: the influence of unobservables," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(11), pages 1281-1299.

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