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Rebalancing China's Economic Growth: Some Insights from Japan's Experience

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  • Tomoyuki Fukumoto
  • Ichiro Muto

Abstract

One of the greatest challenges China faces is how to reshape its heavily investment-driven mode of economic growth. By investigating how the rebalancing of Japan’s economic growth mode was realized in the 1970s, we indicate that it is essential in the rebalancing to correct the distortions in the factor cost (labor cost and capital cost) in a harmonious way. In addition, we refer to Japan’s experience to indicate that achieving domestic rebalancing does not necessarily lead to external rebalancing.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.1749-124X.2012.01273.x
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences in its journal China & World Economy.

Volume (Year): 20 (2012)
Issue (Month): 1 (01)
Pages: 62-82

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Handle: RePEc:bla:chinae:v:20:y:2012:i:1:p:62-82

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  1. Fang Cai & Meiyan Wang, 2008. "A Counterfactual Analysis on Unlimited Surplus Labor in Rural China," China & World Economy, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 16(1), pages 51-65.
  2. Jahangir Aziz & Li Cui, 2007. "Explaining China's Low Consumption," IMF Working Papers 07/181, International Monetary Fund.
  3. Knight, John & Deng, Quheng & Li, Shi, 2011. "The puzzle of migrant labour shortage and rural labour surplus in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 585-600.
  4. Chong-En Bai & Chang-Tai Hsieh & Yingyi Qian, 2006. "The Return to Capital in China," NBER Working Papers 12755, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Zhang, Xiaobo & Yang, Jin & Wang, Shenglin, 2011. "China has reached the Lewis turning point," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 542-554.
  6. Louis Kuijs & Tao Wang, 2006. "China's Pattern of Growth: Moving to Sustainability and Reducing Inequality," China & World Economy, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 14(1), pages 1-14.
  7. Marcos D. Chamon & Eswar S. Prasad, 2010. "Why Are Saving Rates of Urban Households in China Rising?," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 2(1), pages 93-130, January.
  8. Huang, Yiping & Tao, Kunyu, 2011. "Causes of and Remedies for the People’s Republic of China’s External Imbalances: The Role of Factor Market Distortion," ADBI Working Papers 279, Asian Development Bank Institute.
  9. Yiping Huang & Bijun Wang, 2010. "Cost Distortions and Structural Imbalances in China," China & World Economy, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 18(s1), pages 1-17.
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Cited by:
  1. Ettore Dorrucci & Gabor Pula & Daniel Santabárbara, 2013. "China’s economic growth and rebalancing," Banco de Espa�a Occasional Papers 1301, Banco de Espa�a.
  2. Luke Deer & Ligang Song, 2012. "China's Approach to Rebalancing: A Conceptual and Policy Framework," China & World Economy, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 20(1), pages 1-26, 01.
  3. Sun Xuegong, . "China: Searching for a New Development Modal," Chapters, Economic Research Institute for ASEAN and East Asia (ERIA).
  4. Nicholas R. Lardy & Nicholas Borst, 2013. "A Blueprint for Rebalancing the Chinese Economy," Policy Briefs PB13-2, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
  5. van Treeck, Till & Sturn, Simon, 2012. "Income inequality as a cause of the Great Recession? : A survey of current debates," ILO Working Papers 470934, International Labour Organization.
  6. Guonan Ma & Robert McCauley & Lillie Lam, 2013. "The Roles of Saving, Investment and the Renminbi in Rebalancing the Chinese Economy," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 21(1), pages 72-84, 02.

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