Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Employment and the Creation of an Active Citizenry

Contents:

Author Info

  • Lisa Schur
Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    This study examines the link between employment and political participation, using US household survey data. It finds that being employed increases an individual's political activities by more than one-third, primarily through increased income, civic skills, political efficacy and recruitment at work. Union membership and skill-building tasks are strong positive predictors of political participation. In exploring issue-oriented activism, disability activism is found to be lower among employed people with disabilities, but higher among those who report job discrimination. The likely effects of declining unionization, changes in job structures and other workplace and employment trends on overall political participation are discussed. Copyright Blackwell Publishing Ltd/London School of Economics 2003.

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1046/j.1467-8543.2003.00297.x
    File Function: link to full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by London School of Economics in its journal British Journal of Industrial Relations.

    Volume (Year): 41 (2003)
    Issue (Month): 4 (December)
    Pages: 751-771

    as in new window
    Handle: RePEc:bla:brjirl:v:41:y:2003:i:4:p:751-771

    Contact details of provider:
    Postal: Houghton Street, London WC2A 2AE
    Phone: +44 (020) 7405 7686
    Web page: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=0007-1080
    More information through EDIRC

    Order Information:
    Web: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/subs.asp?ref=0007-1080

    Related research

    Keywords:

    References

    No references listed on IDEAS
    You can help add them by filling out this form.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as in new window

    Cited by:
    1. Yamamura, Eiji, 2011. "Differences in the effect of social capital on health status between workers and non-workers," MPRA Paper 32064, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Antoci, Angelo & Sabatini, Fabio & Sodini, Mauro, 2011. "Economic Growth, Technical Progress, and Social Capital: the Inverted U Hypothesis," AICCON Working Papers 86-2011, Associazione Italiana per la Cultura della Cooperazione e del Non Profit.
    3. Antoci, Angelo & Sabatini, Fabio & Sodini, Mauro, 2009. "Will growth and technology destroy social interaction? The inverted U-shape hypothesis," MPRA Paper 18229, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Adam PigoĊ„, 2013. "What Affects Voter Turnout? Macro and Micro Evidence from Poland," Collegium of Economic Analysis Annals, Warsaw School of Economics, Collegium of Economic Analysis, issue 32, pages 77-105.

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:brjirl:v:41:y:2003:i:4:p:751-771. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.