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'High-performance' Management Practices, Working Hours and Work-Life Balance

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  • Michael White
  • Stephen Hill
  • Patrick McGovern
  • Colin Mills
  • Deborah Smeaton
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    Abstract

    The effects of selected high-performance practices and working hours on work-life balance are analysed with data from national surveys of British employees in 1992 and 2000. Alongside long hours, which are a constant source of negative job-to-home spillover, certain 'high-performance' practices have become more strongly related to negative spillover during this period. Surprisingly, dual-earner couples are not especially liable to spillover - if anything, less so than single-earner couples. Additionally, the presence of young children has become less important over time. Overall, the results suggest a conflict between high-performance practices and work-life balance policies. Copyright Blackwell Publishing Ltd/London School of Economics 2003..

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by London School of Economics in its journal British Journal of Industrial Relations.

    Volume (Year): 41 (2003)
    Issue (Month): 2 (06)
    Pages: 175-195

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    Handle: RePEc:bla:brjirl:v:41:y:2003:i:2:p:175-195

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    Cited by:
    1. Alex Bryson & Michael White, 2008. "Organizational commitment: do workplace practices matter?," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 28498, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    2. Martin G├Ąchter & David A. Savage & Benno Torgler, 2013. "Retaining the thin blue line: What shapes workers' intentions not to quit the current work environment," International Journal of Social Economics, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 40(5), pages 479-503, May.
    3. Gupta, Vishal, . "Development of a Causal Framework linking High Perofrmance HRM Practices, Positive Psychological Capital, Creative Behaviours," IIMA Working Papers WP2013-03-05, Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, Research and Publication Department.
    4. Duncan Gallie & Helen Russell, 2009. "Work-Family Conflict and Working Conditions in Western Europe," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 93(3), pages 445-467, September.

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