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Estimating the Benefits of Hilmer and Related Reforms

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  • John Quiggin

Abstract

In a recent report (IC 1995a) the Industry Commission (IC) estimates that the implementation of the Hilmer Report and related reforms will yield a GDP gaim of around 5.4 per cent. In this paper, assumption are subject to a detailed critique. It is argued that most of the estimated productivity gains are grossly over-optimistic, representing upper bounds of possible achievement rather than likely outcomes. Furthermore, it is argued that the dominant flow-on effects of microeconomic reform will be negative, arising from the fact that at least some of the workers directly displaced by reform will permanently displaced from the employed labour force.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research in its journal The Australian Economic Review.

Volume (Year): 30 (1997)
Issue (Month): 3 ()
Pages: 256-272

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Handle: RePEc:bla:ausecr:v:30:y:1997:i:3:p:256-272

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Cited by:
  1. Naughten, Barry, 2003. "Economic assessment of combined cycle gas turbines in Australia: Some effects of microeconomic reform and technological change," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 225-245, February.
  2. George Verikios & Xiao-guang Zhang, 2014. "Structural change and income distribution: the case of Australian telecommunications," Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre Working Papers g-240, Victoria University, Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre.
  3. John L. Whiteman, 1998. "The Potential Benefits of Hilmer and Related Reforms: Electricity Supply," Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre Working Papers g-128, Victoria University, Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre.
  4. Verikios, George & Zhang, Xiao-guang, 2013. "Structural change in the Australian electricity industry during the 1990s and the effect on household income distribution: A macro–micro approach," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 564-575.
  5. Peter Kenyon, 1998. "Discussion of 'Dimensions, Structure and History of Australian Unemployment'," RBA Annual Conference Volume, in: Guy Debelle & Jeff Borland (ed.), Unemployment and the Australian Labour Market Reserve Bank of Australia.
  6. George Verikios & Xiao-guang Zhang, 2013. "Reform of Australian Urban Transport: A CGE-Microsimulation Analysis of the Effects on Income Distribution," Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre Working Papers g-239, Victoria University, Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre.
  7. Madden, John Robert & Giesecke, James, 2002. "Competition reforms and collaborative federalism: a dynamic multiregional applied general equilibrium analysis," ERSA conference papers ersa02p343, European Regional Science Association.
  8. John L. Whiteman, 1999. "The Measurement Of Efficiency Where There Are Multiple Outputs," Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre Working Papers g-134, Victoria University, Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre.
  9. Aghdam, Reza Fathollahzadeh, 2011. "Dynamics of productivity change in the Australian electricity industry: Assessing the impacts of electricity reform," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(6), pages 3281-3295, June.
  10. Cowgill, Matt, 2013. "A Shrinking Slice of the Pie: The Labour Income Share in Australia," MPRA Paper 46209, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  11. Peter B. Dixon & Maureen T. Rimmer, 2002. "Explaining a dynamic CGE simulation with a trade-focused back-of-the-envelope analysis: the effects of eCommerce on Australia," Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre Working Papers g-136, Victoria University, Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre.

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