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Systematic Influences On Teaching Evaluations: The Case For Caution

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  • MARTIN DAVIES
  • JOE HIRSCHBERG
  • JENNY LYE
  • CAROL JOHNSTON
  • IAN MCDONALD

Abstract

In this paper, we examine eight years of Quality of Teaching (QOT) responses from an Economics Department in an Australian University. This is done to determine what factors, besides the instructor, have an impact on the raw average student evaluation scores. Most of the previous research on student ratings has been conducted in the US. One significant difference between US and Australian tertiary education is that, on average, the number of foreign undergraduate students in Australia is ten times the number in US institutions. We find that cultural background significantly affects student evaluations. Other factors that have an influence on the average QOT score include: year level; enrolment size; the quantitative nature of the subject; the gender of the student; fee-paying status by gender; course of study; the differences between the course mark and previous marks; the quality of workbooks; the quality of textbooks; and the QOT score relative to those in other subjects taught at the same time. In addition, average QOT scores for instructors who have taught in a mix of subjects are similar to those based on scores adjusted to account for subject and student characteristics. Copyright 2007 The Authors Journal compilation 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/University of Adelaide and Flinders University .

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Wiley Blackwell in its journal Australian Economic Papers.

Volume (Year): 46 (2007)
Issue (Month): 1 (03)
Pages: 18-38

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Handle: RePEc:bla:ausecp:v:46:y:2007:i:1:p:18-38

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  1. William Bosshardt & Michael Watts, 2001. "Comparing Student and Instructor Evaluations of Teaching," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(1), pages 3-17, January.
  2. White, Halbert, 1980. "A Heteroskedasticity-Consistent Covariance Matrix Estimator and a Direct Test for Heteroskedasticity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(4), pages 817-38, May.
  3. L. F. Jameson Boex, 2000. "Attributes of Effective Economics Instructors: An Analysis of Student Evaluations," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(3), pages 211-227, January.
  4. Omer Gokcekus, 2000. "How do university students value economics courses? A hedonic approach," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(8), pages 493-496.
  5. Mason, Paul M. & Steagall, Jeffrey W. & Fabritius, Michael M., 1995. "Student evaluations of faculty: A new procedure for using aggregate measures of performance," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 14(4), pages 403-416, December.
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Cited by:
  1. Kristof DE WITTE & Nicky ROGGE, 2009. "Accounting for exogenous influences in a benevolent performance evaluation of teachers," Center for Economic Studies - Discussion papers ces09.13, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Centrum voor Economische Studiën.
  2. Bredtmann, Julia & Crede, Carsten J. & Otten, Sebastian, 2013. "Methods for evaluating educational programs: Does Writing Center Participation affect student achievement?," Evaluation and Program Planning, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 115-123.
  3. Silvia Ferrini & Marco P. Tucci, 2011. "Evaluating Research Activity:Impact Factor vs. Research Factor," Department of Economics University of Siena 614, Department of Economics, University of Siena.
  4. De Witte, Kristof & Rogge, Nicky, 2011. "Accounting for exogenous influences in performance evaluations of teachers," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 641-653, August.
  5. Joe Hirschberg & Jenny Lye & Martin Davies & Carol Johnston, 2011. "Measuring Student Experience: Relationships between Teaching Quality Instruments (TQI) and Course Experience Questionnaire (CEQ)," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 1134, The University of Melbourne.
  6. Marco p. Tucci & Sandra Fontani & Silvia Ferrini, 2008. "L’ “R-Factor”: un nuovo modo di valutare la ricerca scientifica," Department of Economics University of Siena 527, Department of Economics, University of Siena.

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