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Technology adoption under seed access constraints and the economic impacts of improved pigeonpea varieties in Tanzania

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Author Info

  • Bekele A. Shiferaw
  • Tewodros A. Kebede
  • Liang You

Abstract

Dry-land legumes, well adapted to drought-prone areas, have largely been neglected in the past despite the good opportunities they offer for income growth and food (and nutritional) security for the poor. This study evaluated the adoption and impact of two farmer and market-preferred and disease-resistant pigeonpea varieties that were developed and promoted in semi-arid Tanzania. The new varieties were resistant to fusarium wilt, a fungal disease devastating the crop. However, farmers wanting to adopt new varieties did not adopt due to seed access constraints and under-developed seed delivery systems. Adoption of new varieties is therefore analyzed using an augmented double hurdle model that allows estimating variety adoption conditional on seed access thresholds accounting for the additional information on sample separation. The study identifies the crucial role of seed access (local supply), extension, education, participatory decision making, capital, and household assets in determining adoption. The social economic benefits of the technology and policies for improved seed access were further analyzed using the extended economic surplus method (DREAM model). Even under restrictive assumptions, overall discounted benefits were found to be quite attractive, indicating the need for additional efforts to scale-up the success story. Analysis of changes in research benefits from relaxing the seed access constraint showed that net gains would increase by up to 30% if farmer access to improved seeds can be assured. Smallholder farmers are the major beneficiaries along with consumers and rural net-buyers who gain from productivity-induced lower market prices. Copyright (c) 2008 International Association of Agricultural Economists.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by International Association of Agricultural Economists in its journal Agricultural Economics.

Volume (Year): 39 (2008)
Issue (Month): 3 (November)
Pages: 309-323

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Handle: RePEc:bla:agecon:v:39:y:2008:i:3:p:309-323

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Cited by:
  1. Rao, Elizaphan J.O. & Qaim, Matin, 2013. "Supermarkets and agricultural labor demand in Kenya: A gendered perspective," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 165-176.
  2. Asfaw, Solomon & Shiferaw, Bekele A., 2010. "Agricultural Technology Adoption and Rural Poverty: Application of an Endogenous Switching Regression for Selected East African Countries," 2010 AAAE Third Conference/AEASA 48th Conference, September 19-23, 2010, Cape Town, South Africa 97049, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE) & Agricultural Economics Association of South Africa (AEASA).
  3. Shiferaw, Bekele & Kassie, Menale & Jaleta, Moti & Yirga, Chilot, 2014. "Adoption of improved wheat varieties and impacts on household food security in Ethiopia," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 272-284.
  4. Nassul S. Kabunga & Thomas Dubois & Matin Qaim, 2011. "Impact of Tissue Culture Banana Technology on Farm Household Income and Food Security in Kenya," Courant Research Centre: Poverty, Equity and Growth - Discussion Papers 89, Courant Research Centre PEG.
  5. Raphael Nawrotzki & Fernando Riosmena & Lori Hunter, 2013. "Do Rainfall Deficits Predict U.S.-Bound Migration from Rural Mexico? Evidence from the Mexican Census," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer, vol. 32(1), pages 129-158, February.
  6. Rao, Elizaphan J.O. & Qaim, Matin, 2011. "The supermarket revolution and impacts on agricultural labor markets: Empirical evidence from Kenya," Discussion Papers 107745, Georg-August-Universitaet Goettingen, GlobalFood, Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Development.
  7. Asfaw, Solomon & Shiferaw, Bekele & Simtowe, Franklin & Lipper, Leslie, 2012. "Impact of modern agricultural technologies on smallholder welfare: Evidence from Tanzania and Ethiopia," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 283-295.
  8. Sigei, Geoffrey & Bett, Hillary & Kibet, Lawrence, 2014. "Determinants of Market Participation among Small-scale Pineapple Farmers in Kericho County, Kenya," MPRA Paper 56149, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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