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Mitigation potential and costs for global agricultural greenhouse gas emissions-super-1

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  • Robert H. Beach
  • Benjamin J. DeAngelo
  • Steven Rose
  • Changsheng Li
  • William Salas
  • Stephen J. DelGrosso

Abstract

Agricultural activities are a substantial contributor to global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, accounting for about 58% of the world's anthropogenic non-carbon dioxide GHG emissions and 14% of all anthropogenic GHG emissions, and agriculture is often viewed as a potential source of relatively low-cost emissions reductions. We estimate the costs of GHG mitigation for 36 world agricultural regions for the 2000-2020 period, taking into account net GHG reductions, yield effects, livestock productivity effects, commodity prices, labor requirements, and capital costs where appropriate. For croplands and rice cultivation, we use biophysical, process-based models (DAYCENT and DNDC) to capture the net GHG and yield effects of baseline and mitigation scenarios for different world regions. For the livestock sector, we use information from the literature on key mitigation options and apply the mitigation options to emission baselines compiled by EPA. Copyright 2008 International Association of Agricultural Economists.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by International Association of Agricultural Economists in its journal Agricultural Economics.

Volume (Year): 38 (2008)
Issue (Month): 2 (03)
Pages: 109-115

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Handle: RePEc:bla:agecon:v:38:y:2008:i:2:p:109-115

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Cited by:
  1. Innocent Bakam & Robin Matthews, 2009. "Emission trading in agriculture: a study of design options using an agent-based approach," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 14(8), pages 755-776, December.
  2. De Cara, St├ęphane & Jayet, Pierre-Alain, 2011. "Marginal abatement costs of greenhouse gas emissions from European agriculture, cost effectiveness, and the EU non-ETS burden sharing agreement," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(9), pages 1680-1690, July.
  3. Stefan Wirsenius & Fredrik Hedenus & Kristina Mohlin, 2011. "Greenhouse gas taxes on animal food products: rationale, tax scheme and climate mitigation effects," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 108(1), pages 159-184, September.
  4. Fredrik Hedenus & Stefan Wirsenius & Daniel Johansson, 2014. "The importance of reduced meat and dairy consumption for meeting stringent climate change targets," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 124(1), pages 79-91, May.
  5. Nigel Key & Gregoire Tallard, 2012. "Mitigating methane emissions from livestock: a global analysis of sectoral policies," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 112(2), pages 387-414, May.
  6. Acworth, William & Edwards, Astrid, 2011. "Trading Carbon into Agriculture: making it happen," 2011 Conference (55th), February 8-11, 2011, Melbourne, Australia 100528, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
  7. Rose, Steven K. & Ahammad, Helal & Eickhout, Bas & Fisher, Brian & Kurosawa, Atsushi & Rao, Shilpa & Riahi, Keywan & van Vuuren, Detlef P., 2012. "Land-based mitigation in climate stabilization," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(1), pages 365-380.
  8. Wen Wang & Frank Koslowski & Dali Rani Nayak & Pete Smith & Eli Saetnan & Xiaotang Ju & Liping Guo & Guodong Han & Christian de Perthuis & Erda Lin & Dominic Moran, 2013. "Greenhouse gas mitigation in Chinese agriculture: distinguishing technical and economic potentials," Working Papers 1310, Chaire Economie du Climat.
  9. MacLeod, Michael & Moran, Dominic & Eory, Vera & Rees, R.M. & Barnes, Andrew & Topp, Cairistiona F.E. & Ball, Bruce & Hoad, Steve & Wall, Eileen & McVittie, Alistair & Pajot, Guillaume & Matthews, Rob, 2010. "Developing greenhouse gas marginal abatement cost curves for agricultural emissions from crops and soils in the UK," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 103(4), pages 198-209, May.

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