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Comparing tertiary graduates with and without student loans in Latvia

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Author Info

  • Ali Ait Si Mhamed

    ()
    (Department of Adolescence Education, Canisius College)

  • Rita Kaša

    ()
    (Stockholm School of Economics in Riga)

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    Abstract

    Using a nationally representative sample, this paper describes the profile of student borrowing in Latvia. The paper, more specifically, explores whether higher education graduates with student loans are significantly different from graduates without student loans in Latvia. We compare two groups of university graduates in terms of their demographic and household characteristics, income, and activity in the labor market in terms of the rank of appointment in the company and supplementary income job. Using data from the survey Professional Activity of Graduates of Institutions of Higher and Vocational Education conducted in 2006, differences are observed in the characteristics of their households, ethnicity, and age. We conclude that, on average, student debt holders and higher education graduates without student loans are rather similar in terms of gender, employment pattern, and income.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Baltic International Centre for Economic Policy Studies in its journal Baltic Journal of Economics.

    Volume (Year): 10 (2010)
    Issue (Month): 2 (December)
    Pages: 49-62

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    Handle: RePEc:bic:journl:v:10:y:2010:i:2:p:49-62

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    Related research

    Keywords: Higher education; graduates; student loans; student debt; Latvia;

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    References

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    1. Lei Zhang, 2013. "Effects of college educational debt on graduate school attendance and early career and lifestyle choices," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(2), pages 154-175, March.
    2. Mihails Hazans & Ija Trapeznikova & Olga Rastrigina, 2008. "Ethnic and parental effects on schooling outcomes before and during the transition: evidence from the Baltic countries," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 21(3), pages 719-749, July.
    3. Gary S. Becker & Kevin M. Murphy, 2007. "Education and Consumption: The Effects of Education in the Household Compared to the Marketplace," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, vol. 1(1), pages 9-35.
    4. Jesse Rothstein & Cecilia Elena Rouse, 2007. "Constrained After College: Student Loans and Early Career Occupational Choices," NBER Working Papers 13117, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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