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Borders, Common Currencies, Trade, and Welfare: What Can We Learn from the Evidence?

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Abstract

Recent evidence indicates that the intensity of economic exchange within and across borders is significantly different: linkages are much tighter within, than among, nation-states. These findings, however, do not necessarily imply that borders and separate national currencies represent significant barriers to trade that should be removed, since the evidence is also consistent with the alternative hypothesis, that domestic exchange is more efficient because domestic producers are better able to satisfy the requirements of local consumers, owing to common tastes and institutions and the existence of local information and social networks. Focusing primarily on trade linkages within and between Canada and the United States, the authors review the evidence on the extent to which national borders lessen the intensity of international economic linkages, primarily trade in goods and services, and the effects on domestic welfare. They also examine the evidence on the impact of common currencies on trade and welfare. They determine that, since the empirical models employed to date in this research cannot distinguish between alternative explanations of the evidence, it is not yet possible to draw firm conclusions for policy-making.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Bank of Canada in its journal Bank of Canada Review.

Volume (Year): 2005 (2005)
Issue (Month): Spring ()
Pages: 19-33

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Handle: RePEc:bca:bcarev:v:2005:y:2005:i:spring05:p:19-33

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  1. Thom, Rodney & Walsh, Brendan, 2002. "The effect of a currency union on trade: Lessons from the Irish experience," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 46(6), pages 1111-1123, June.
  2. Andrew K. Rose & Eric van Wincoop, 2001. "National Money as a Barrier to International Trade: The Real Case for Currency Union," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(2), pages 386-390, May.
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Cited by:
  1. Dennis Novy, 2011. "Gravity Redux: Measuring International Trade Costs with Panel Data," CESifo Working Paper Series 3616, CESifo Group Munich.
  2. Bröcker, Johannes & Korzhenevych, Artem & Riekhof, Marie-Catherine, 2011. "Predicting freight flows in a globalising world," Research in Transportation Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 37-44.

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