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Consumer Demand Analysis According To Garp

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  • Alston, Julian M.
  • Chalfant, James A.

Abstract

The nonparametric approach to consumer-demand analysis-based on revealed-preference axioms-is reviewed. Particular attention is paid to questions of size and power of tests for consistency of data with the existence of a stable, well-behaved utility function that could have generated the data. An application to Australian meat demand is used to show how these notions can be quantified and how prior information about elasticities, following Sakong and Hayes, may be used to increase the power of the approach.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/28992
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association in its journal Northeastern Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics.

Volume (Year): 21 (1992)
Issue (Month): 2 (October)
Pages:

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Handle: RePEc:ags:nejare:28992

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Web page: http://www.narea.org/
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References

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  1. Nicholas E. Piggott & James A. Chalfant & Julian M. Alston & Garry R. Griffith, 1996. "Demand Response to Advertising in the Australian Meat Industry," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 78(2), pages 268-279.
  2. William J. Martin & Darrell Porter, 1985. "Testing For Changes In The Structure Of The Demand For Meat In Australia," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 29(1), pages 16-31, 04.
  3. Moschini, GianCarlo & Meilke, Karl D., 1989. "Modeling the Pattern of Structural Change in U.S. Meat Demand," Staff General Research Papers 11266, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  4. Belongia, Michael T & Chalfant, James A, 1989. "The Changing Empirical Definition of Money: Some Estimates from a Model of the Demand for Money Substitutes," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 97(2), pages 387-97, April.
  5. Alston, Julian M. & Chalfant, James A., 1991. "Can We Take The Con Out Of Meat Demand Studies?," Western Journal of Agricultural Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 16(01), July.
  6. Chalfant, James A & Alston, Julian M, 1988. "Accounting for Changes in Tastes," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 96(2), pages 391-410, April.
  7. Diewert, W. E. & Parkan, C., 1985. "Tests for the consistency of consumer data," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 30(1-2), pages 127-147.
  8. Yong Sakong & Dermot J. Hayes, 1992. "Test for the Consistency of Demand Data with Consumer Preference Theory, A," Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) Publications 92-wp87, Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Cortez, Rafael & Senauer, Benjamin, 1994. "Taste Changes In The Demand For Food By Demographic Groups In The United States: A Nonparametric Empirical Analysis," Staff Papers 14091, University of Minnesota, Department of Applied Economics.
  2. Aziz, Babar & Shahnawaz, Malik, 2005. "Demand for Meat; Seprability and Structural changes (A Nonparametric Analysis)," MPRA Paper 22932, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 2005.
  3. Hailu, Getu & Goddard, Ellen W., 2010. "The changing egg demand in Canada: do advertising and health message contents matter?," 115th Joint EAAE/AAEA Seminar, September 15-17, 2010, Freising-Weihenstephan, Germany 116427, European Association of Agricultural Economists & Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  4. Abid A. Burki, 1997. "Estimating Consumer Preferences for Food, Using Time Series Data of Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 36(2), pages 131-153.
  5. Rickertsen, Kyrre, 1998. "The demand for food and beverages in Norway," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 18(1), pages 89-100, January.
  6. Hovhannisyan, Vardges & Gould, Brian W., 2012. "Structural Changes in Chinese Food Preferences," 2012 Annual Meeting, August 12-14, 2012, Seattle, Washington 125978, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

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