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Costs Of Improving Food Safety In The Meat Sector

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Author Info

  • Jensen, Helen H.
  • Unnevehr, Laurian J.
  • Gomez, Miguel I.

Abstract

Recently enacted food safety regulations require processors to meet product standards for microbial contamination in meat products. An analysis of the cost-effectiveness of several technological interventions for microbial control in beef and pork processing shows that marginal improvements in food safety can be obtained, but at increasing costs. The additional food safety intervention costs represent about 1% of total processing costs for beef and pork. Some interventions and combinations are more cost-effective than others.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/15090
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Southern Agricultural Economics Association in its journal Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics.

Volume (Year): 30 (1998)
Issue (Month): 01 (July)
Pages:

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Handle: RePEc:ags:joaaec:15090

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Web page: http://www.saea.org/jaae/jaae.htm
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Related research

Keywords: Food safety; Meat processing; Regulation; Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety;

References

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  1. Crutchfield, Stephen R. & Buzby, Jean C. & Roberts, Tanya & Ollinger, Michael & Lin, Chung-Tung Jordan, 1997. "Economic Assessment of Food Safety Regulations: The New Approach to Meat and Poultry Inspection," Agricultural Economics Reports 34009, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  2. Tanya Roberts & Jean C. Buzby & Michael Ollinger, 1996. "Using Benefit and Cost Information to Evaluate a Food Safety Regulation: HACCP for Meat and Poultry," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 78(5), pages 1297-1301.
  3. Michael A. Mazzocco, 1996. "HACCP as a Business Management Tool," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 78(3), pages 770-774.
  4. James M. MacDonald & Stephen Crutchfield, 1996. "Modeling the Costs of Food Safety Regulation," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 78(5), pages 1285-1290.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Unnevehr, Laurian J. & Jensen, Helen H., 1999. "The economic implications of using HACCP as a food safety regulatory standard," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 24(6), pages 625-635, December.
  2. Laurian J. Unnevehr & Helen H. Jensen, 1999. "Economic Implications of Using HACCP as a Food Safety Regulatory Standard, The," Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) Publications 99-wp228, Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University.
  3. Resende Filho, Moises de Andrade & Buhr, Brian L., 2012. "Economics of Traceability for Mitigation of Food Recall Costs," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 126193, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  4. Pozo, Veronica F. & Schroeder, Ted C., 2013. "Effects of Meat Recalls on Firms' Stock Prices," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 151287, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  5. Loren W. Tauer & Cameron Nightingale & Renata Ivanek & Yrjö T. Gröhn & Martin Wiedmann, 2007. "Optimal levels of inputs to control Listeria monocytogenes contamination at a smoked fish plant," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 23(2), pages 229-244.
  6. Golan, Elise H. & Vogel, Stephen J. & Frenzen, Paul D. & Ralston, Katherine L., 2000. "Tracing The Costs And Benefits Of Improvements In Food Safety: The Case Of Hazard Analysis And Critical Control Point Program For Meat And Poultry," Agricultural Economics Reports 34023, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  7. Narrod, Clare A. & Malcolm, Scott A. & Ollinger, Michael & Roberts, Tanya, 1999. "Pathogen Reduction Options In Slaughterhouses And Methods For Evaluating Their Economic Effectiveness," 1999 Annual meeting, August 8-11, Nashville, TN 21562, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).

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