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Political Economy of the U.S. Cattle and Beef Industry: Innovation Adoption and Implications for the Future

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Author Info

  • Bailey, DeeVon

Abstract

Market innovation and investment are key elements contributing to the health and success of any industry. However, U.S. cattle and beef interests appear to be resisting some of the market innovations that are occurring in their industry. This includes resisting innovations designed to provide more information and transparency in the marketing chain, such as additional traceability provided by animal identification systems. This paper discusses how institutions supporting the U.S. cattle and beef industry may be failing the industry in terms of helping it adjust to new market conditions, including failing to help the industry foster market innovation. Recommendations are given relating to the first steps of government and the land-grant system can take to change research and extension agendas relating to the beef industry.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/7079
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Western Agricultural Economics Association in its journal Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics.

Volume (Year): 32 (2007)
Issue (Month): 03 (December)
Pages:

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Handle: RePEc:ags:jlaare:7079

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Web page: http://waeaonline.org/
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Related research

Keywords: competition in world beef markets; market innovation; U.S. beef industry; Livestock Production/Industries;

References

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  1. Pouliot, Sebastien & Sumner, Daniel A., 2006. "Traceability, Liability and Incentives for Food Safety and Quality," 2006 Annual meeting, July 23-26, Long Beach, CA 21121, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  2. Steiger, Carlos, 2006. "Modern Beef Production in Brazil and Argentina," Choices, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 21(2).
  3. Brester, Gary W., 2006. "Research and Publishing: Relevance and Irreverence," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 31(03), December.
  4. Dee Von Bailey & Eluned Jones & David L. Dickinson, 2002. "Knowledge Management and Comparative International Strategies on Vertical Information Flow in the Global Food System," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 84(5), pages 1337-1344.
  5. Thor, Eric, III & Bailey, DeeVon & Silvac, Alejandro R. & Vickner, Steven S., 2007. "Economic Analysis of Incentives for Foreign Direct Investment in Beef Systems in Argentina and Uruguay," International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, International Food and Agribusiness Management Association (IAMA), vol. 10(03).
  6. Frode Alfnes & Kyrre Rickertsen, 2003. "European Consumers' Willingness to Pay for U.S. Beef in Experimental Auction Markets," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 85(2), pages 396-405.
  7. Frenzen, Paul D. & Buzby, Jean C. & Rasco, Barbara, 2001. "Product Liability And Microbial Foodborne Illness," Agricultural Economics Reports 34059, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  8. Boland, Michael A. & Perez, Lautaro & Fox, John A., 2007. "Grass-Fed Certification: The Case of the Uruguayan Beef Industry," Choices, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 22(1).
  9. DeeVon Bailey & Jeremy Slade, 2004. "Factors Influencing Support for a National Animal Identification System for Cattle in the United States," Working Papers 2004-09, Utah State University, Department of Economics.
  10. Bailey, DeeVon & Slade, Jeremy, 2004. "Factors Influencing Support For A National Animal Identification System In The United States," 2004 Annual meeting, August 1-4, Denver, CO 20293, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  11. Laurian J. Unnevehr, 2004. "Mad Cows and Bt Potatoes: Global Public Goods in the Food System," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 86(5), pages 1159-1166.
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Cited by:
  1. Martinez, Stephen W., 2011. "Brand Premiums in the U.S. Beef Industry," Journal of Food Distribution Research, Food Distribution Research Society, vol. 42(2), July.

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