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How Much Do Consumers Benefit from New Brand Introductions? The Case of Potato Chips

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Author Info

  • Arnade, Carlos A.
  • Gopinath, Munisamy
  • Pick, Daniel H.

Abstract

This study identifies consumer welfare from new brand introductions in the potato chip market. Price and variety effects of new brand introduction are measured by estimating a demand system underlying an expenditure function. Variety effects are positive in most cities, while price effects are generally negative when consumers exhibit some variety preference. Variety effects dominate price effects in most cities; an opposite effect observed in some cities may indicate high entry barriers or joint brand- and price-based marketing strategies. Results indicate that consumers and producers gain from product innovations, but substantial regional variation exists in the distributional effects of new brand introduction.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/105529
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Western Agricultural Economics Association in its journal Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics.

Volume (Year): 36 (2011)
Issue (Month): 1 (April)
Pages:

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Handle: RePEc:ags:jlaare:105529

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Web page: http://waeaonline.org/
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Related research

Keywords: city-demand system; compensating variation; consumer welfare; new brands; virtual prices; Consumer/Household Economics; Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety;

References

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  1. Stathis Klonaris & David Hallam, 2003. "Conditional and unconditional food demand elasticities in a dynamic multistage demand system," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(5), pages 503-514.
  2. Carlos Arnade & Munisamy Gopinath, 2006. "The Dynamics of Individuals' Fat Consumption," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 88(4), pages 836-850.
  3. Frank Asche & Cathy R. Wessells, 1997. "On Price Indices in the Almost Ideal Demand System," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 79(4), pages 1182-1185.
  4. Geoffrey M. Pofahl & Timothy J. Richards, 2007. "Valuation of New Products in Attribute Space," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 91(2), pages 402-415.
  5. Marina Giacomo, 2008. "GMM estimation of a structural demand model for yogurt and the effects of the introduction of new brands," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 34(3), pages 537-565, June.
  6. Timothy J. Richards & Stephen F. Hamilton, 2006. "Rivalry in Price and Variety among Supermarket Retailers," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 88(3), pages 710-726.
  7. Federico Perali & Jean-Paul Chavas, 2000. "Estimation of Censored Demand Equations from Large Cross-Section Data," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 82(4), pages 1022-1037.
  8. J. Scott Shonkwiler & Steven T. Yen, 1999. "Two-Step Estimation of a Censored System of Equations," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 81(4), pages 972-982.
  9. Jeffrey T. LaFrance, 1991. "Consumer's surplus versus compensating variation revisited," Development Research Unit Working Paper Series archive-35, Monash University, Department of Economics.
  10. Nair, Harikesh S. & Dube, Jean-Pierre & Chintagunta, Pradeep, 2004. "Accounting for Primary and Secondary Demand Effects with Aggregate Data," Research Papers 1949, Stanford University, Graduate School of Business.
  11. Ardelean, Adina & Lugovskyy, Volodymyr, 2010. "Domestic productivity and variety gains from trade," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 80(2), pages 280-291, March.
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Cited by:
  1. Daniel Toro-Gonzalez & Jia Yan & R. Karina Gallardo & Jill J. McCluskey, 2013. "Estimation of Unobserved Attributes Using a Control Function Approach, Modeling the Demand for Mint Flavored Gum," Working Papers 2013-06, School of Economic Sciences, Washington State University.

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