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Global Trade Reforms and Income Distribution in Developing Countries

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  • Brooks, Jonathan
  • Dewbre, Joe
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    Abstract

    This paper examines the effects of trade and domestic agricultural policy reforms on the distribution of incomes in six developing countries: Brazil, China, India, Malawi, Mexico and South Africa. The aggregate results from a global trade model are fed into separate national models. The insights available from alternative model types are evaluated. The distributional impacts of reform are found to be complex and to vary between countries. Given that it is typically impossible to reform (or equally not reform) without hurting some households with lower incomes, the conclusion is that it makes sense to help these households with targeted policies.

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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/110130
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Food and Agriculture Organization, Agricultural and Development Economics Division in its journal eJADE: electronic Journal of Agricultural and Development Economics.

    Volume (Year): 03 (2006)
    Issue (Month): 1 ()
    Pages:

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    Handle: RePEc:ags:ejadef:110130

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    Related research

    Keywords: trade reform; liberalisation; agriculture; income distribution; poverty; general equilibrium; Financial Economics; International Relations/Trade;

    References

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    1. McCulloch, Neil, 2003. "The impact of structural reforms on poverty : a simple methodology with extensions," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3124, The World Bank.
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    Cited by:
    1. Ruslana Palatnik & Roberto Roson, 2012. "Climate change and agriculture in computable general equilibrium models: alternative modeling strategies and data needs," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 112(3), pages 1085-1100, June.

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