Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Evolving Patterns of Agricultural Trade between Australia and China

Contents:

Author Info

  • Zhou, Zhang-Yue
  • Wu, Yan-Rui
  • Si, Wei
Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    Agricultural trade between Australia and China has increased significantly in recent years and the momentum is likely to continue. However, concerns exist in both countries over the likely negative impacts of the increased agricultural trade on their domestic industries. This paper examines agricultural trade patterns between Australian and China and addresses the question as to whether agricultural trade between them is competitive or complementary. Our study shows that agricultural trade between the two countries is set to further increase and there is a high level of agricultural trade complementarity between the two countries. Increased agricultural trade is unlikely to generate much negative impacts on their agricultural sectors as a whole, although producers in some industries may be adversely affected to some extent. In general, both countries will benefit from the expansion of agricultural trade between them.

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/126081
    Download Restriction: no

    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by University of Melbourne, Melbourne School of Land and Environment in its journal Australasian Agribusiness Review.

    Volume (Year): 15 (2007)
    Issue (Month): ()
    Pages:

    as in new window
    Handle: RePEc:ags:auagre:126081

    Contact details of provider:
    Web page: http://www.agrifood.info/review/

    Related research

    Keywords: Agricultural trade; Australia; China; domestic industries; competitive; complementary; impact; agricultural sector; Agribusiness; Agricultural and Food Policy; Crop Production/Industries; Farm Management; International Development; International Relations/Trade; Livestock Production/Industries; Production Economics; ISSN 1442-6951;

    References

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
    as in new window
    1. Bent Dalum & Keld Laursen & Gert Villumsen, 1998. "Structural Change in OECD Export Specialisation Patterns: de-specialisation and 'stickiness'," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(3), pages 423-443.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:auagre:126081. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.