Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

The optimal allocation of water along a system of rivers: a continuous model with sequential bidding

Contents:

Author Info

  • Coram, Alex
Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    This paper uses a control theory approach to analyse the collectively optimal rate of extraction along a river system and constructs a bidding mechanism that would produce the required prices at each point. It also analyses some characteristics of this mechanism. This approach brings some new perspective to existing work on externalities. It also helps bring to light some aspects of the system as a whole that may be less obvious in a more piecemeal analysis, including the fact that there may not be an optimal solution to the allocation problem. Although the bidding mechanism may be difficult to implement, it may be possible to design various forms of hybrid schemes that have practical value.

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/116974
    Download Restriction: no

    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society in its journal Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics.

    Volume (Year): 50 (2006)
    Issue (Month): 3 (September)
    Pages:

    as in new window
    Handle: RePEc:ags:aareaj:116974

    Contact details of provider:
    Postal: AARES Central Office Manager, Crawford School of Public Policy, ANU, Canberra ACT 0200
    Phone: 0409 032 338
    Email:
    Web page: http://www.aares.info
    More information through EDIRC

    Related research

    Keywords: control theory; mechanism design; optimal allocation; rights markets; waters; Resource /Energy Economics and Policy;

    References

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
    as in new window
    1. Weber, Marian L., 2001. "Markets for Water Rights under Environmental Constraints," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 42(1), pages 53-64, July.
    2. D. Kilgour & Ariel Dinar, 2001. "Flexible Water Sharing within an International River Basin," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 18(1), pages 43-60, January.
    3. Quiggin, John C., 2001. "Environmental economics and the Murray-Darling river system," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 45(1), March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as in new window

    Cited by:
    1. Nadine Wittmann, 2014. "A Note on Distortional Distributional Effects in River Basin Discharge Permit Trade," Water Resources Management, Springer, vol. 28(1), pages 279-285, January.
    2. Erik Ansink & Hans-Peter Weikard, 2012. "Sequential sharing rules for river sharing problems," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer, vol. 38(2), pages 187-210, February.
    3. Nadine Wittmann, 2014. "A Microeconomic Perspective on Water Resources Management: Analyzing the Effects on Optimal Land Rents Along a River Basin," Water Resources Management, Springer, vol. 28(5), pages 1309-1325, March.

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:aareaj:116974. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.