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American education in the age of mass migrations 1870–1930

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  • Fabrice Murtin

    ()
    (OECD, Paris, France, Center for the Economics of Education (LSE), London, UK, CREST (INSEE), Malakoff Cedex, France.)

  • Martina Viarengo

    ()
    (Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA, Kennedy School of Government, Cambridge, MA, USA, London School of Economics, London, UK.)

Abstract

This paper derives original series of average years of schooling in the United States 1870–1930, which take into account the impact of mass migrations on the US educational level. We reconstruct the foreign-born US population by age and by country of origin, while combining data on the flow of migrants by country and the age pyramids of migrants by country. Then, we use original data on educational attainment in the nineteenth century presented in Morrisson and Murtin (J Human Cap, in press) in order to estimate the educational level of US immigrants by age and by country. As a result, our series are consistent with the first national estimates of average schooling in 1940. We show that mass migrations have had a significant but modest impact on the US average educational attainment. However, the educational gap between US natives and immigrants was large and increased with the second immigration wave, a phenomenon that most likely fostered the implementation of restrictive immigration rules in the 1920s.

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File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11698-009-0043-2
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC) in its journal Cliometrica, Journal of Historical Economics and Econometric History.

Volume (Year): 4 (2010)
Issue (Month): 2 (June)
Pages: 113-139

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Handle: RePEc:afc:cliome:v:4:y:2010:i:2:p:113-139

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Web page: http://www.cliometrie.org
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Related research

Keywords: Education; Migrations; Economic history; Economic development research;

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Cited by:
  1. Murtin, Fabrice & Wacziarg, Romain, 2011. "The Democratic Transition," CEPR Discussion Papers 8599, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Stolz, Yvonne & Baten, Jörg & Botelho, Tarcísio, 2011. "Growth effects of 19th century mass migrations: "Fome Zero" for Brazil," University of Tuebingen Working Papers in Economics and Finance 20, University of Tuebingen, Faculty of Economics and Social Sciences.
  3. Christian Morrisson & Fabrice Murtin, 2010. "The Kuznets Curve of Education: A Global Perspective on Education Inequalities," CEE Discussion Papers 0116, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
  4. Christian Morrisson & Fabrice Murtin, 2009. "The Century of Education," CEE Discussion Papers 0109, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
  5. Christian Morrison & Fabrice Murtin, 2009. "The century of education," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 51583, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  6. repec:hal:wpaper:halshs-00586751 is not listed on IDEAS

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