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The Modern Expansion of Tort Liability: Its Sources, Its Effects, and Its Reform

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  • George L. Priest
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    Abstract

    This paper reviews the development of tort law during the 20th century with particular attention to the broad expansion of liability since the 1970s. It attempts to explain the origins of the expansion of liability; to present examples of its effects on product and service markets; and to analyze the extensive efforts of the past five to six years toward liability reform, efforts which I conclude have had only a slight relationship to the underlying sources of modern liability problems. Though the empirical evidence is thin, virtually all studies of the effects of specific modern rules demonstrate that modern tort law has substantially dislocated product and service markets, as one might expect of an assertive legal regime founded on largely noneconomic principles. As we shall see, market dislocations, especially for insurance, have increased sharply during the past decade.

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    File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/jep.5.3.31
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by American Economic Association in its journal Journal of Economic Perspectives.

    Volume (Year): 5 (1991)
    Issue (Month): 3 (Summer)
    Pages: 31-50

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    Handle: RePEc:aea:jecper:v:5:y:1991:i:3:p:31-50

    Note: DOI: 10.1257/jep.5.3.31
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    Cited by:
    1. Hans-Bernd Schaefer, 2000. "The Bundling of Similar Interests in Litigation. The Incentives for Class Action and Legal Actions taken by Associations," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 9(3), pages 183-213, May.
    2. Clive D. Fraser, . "On Tort as an Implicit Insurance System with State-Dependent Utility. The Case of Child Mortality Risk," Discussion Papers in Public Sector Economics 96/4, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.

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