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Financial Intermediation and Macroeconomic Analysis

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  • Michael Woodford

Abstract

Understanding phenomena such as the recent financial crisis, and possible policy responses, requires the use of a macroeconomic framework in which financial intermediation matters for the allocation of resources. Neither standard macroeconomic models that abstract from financial intermediation nor traditional models of the "bank lending channel" are adequate as a basis for understanding the recent crisis. Instead we need models in which intermediation plays a crucial role, but in which intermediation is modeled in a way that better conforms to current institutional realities. In particular, we need models that recognize that a market-based financial system—one in which intermediaries fund themselves by selling securities in competitive markets, rather than collecting deposits subject to reserve requirements—is not the same as a frictionless system. I sketch the basic elements of an approach that allows financial intermediation and credit frictions to be integrated into macroeconomic analysis in a straightforward way. I show how the model can be used to analyze the macroeconomic consequences of the recent financial crisis and conclude with a discussion of some implications of the model for the conduct of monetary policy.

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File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/jep.24.4.21
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by American Economic Association in its journal Journal of Economic Perspectives.

Volume (Year): 24 (2010)
Issue (Month): 4 (Fall)
Pages: 21-44

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Handle: RePEc:aea:jecper:v:24:y:2010:i:4:p:21-44

Note: DOI: 10.1257/jep.24.4.21
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  1. Vasco Cúrdia & Michael Woodford, 2010. "The central-bank balance sheet as an instrument of monetary policy," Staff Reports 463, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  2. Goodfriend, Marvin & McCallum, Bennett T., 2007. "Banking and interest rates in monetary policy analysis: A quantitative exploration," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(5), pages 1480-1507, July.
  3. Dubecq, S. & Mojon, B. & Ragot, X., 2009. "Fuzzy Capital Requirements, Risk-Shifting and the Risk Taking Channel of Monetary Policy," Working papers 254, Banque de France.
  4. Markus K. Brunnermeier, 2009. "Deciphering the Liquidity and Credit Crunch 2007-2008," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 23(1), pages 77-100, Winter.
  5. Vasco Cúrdia & Michael Woodford, 2009. "Credit Spreads and Monetary Policy," NBER Working Papers 15289, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Michael Woodford, 2007. "The Case for Forecast Targeting as a Monetary Policy Strategy," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 21(4), pages 3-24, Fall.
  7. Jean-Pierre Zigrand & Hyun Song Shin & Jon Danielsson, 2010. "Risk Appetite and Endogenous Risk," FMG Discussion Papers dp647, Financial Markets Group.
  8. Anil K. Kashyap & Jeremy C. Stein, 1994. "Monetary Policy and Bank Lending," NBER Chapters, in: Monetary Policy, pages 221-261 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Ben S. Bernanke & Mark Gertler, 1995. "Inside the Black Box: The Credit Channel of Monetary Policy Transmission," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 9(4), pages 27-48, Fall.
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