Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

The Coming Global Climate-Technology Revolution

Contents:

Author Info

  • Scott Barrett
Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    Emissions of CO2 and other greenhouse gases can be reduced significantly using existing technologies, but stabilizing concentrations will require a technological revolution--a "revolution" because it will require fundamental change, achieved within a relatively short period of time. Inspiration for a climate-technology revolution is often drawn from the Apollo space program or the Manhattan Project, but averting dangerous climate change cannot be "solved" by a single new technology, deployed by a single government. The technological changes needed to address climate change fundamentally will have to be pervasive; they will have to involve markets; and they will have to be global in scope. My focus in this paper is not on the moderate emission reductions that can be achieved using existing technologies, but on the breakthrough technologies that are needed to reduce emissions dramatically. The challenges are formidable. Indeed, it is possible that the revolution needed to dramatically reduce emissions of greenhouse gases will fail. Should the climate change abruptly, the incentive to "engineer" the climate will be strong. There will be a climate-technology revolution, but its nature will depend on the institutions we develop to address the challenge we face.

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/jep.23.2.53
    Download Restriction: no

    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by American Economic Association in its journal Journal of Economic Perspectives.

    Volume (Year): 23 (2009)
    Issue (Month): 2 (Spring)
    Pages: 53-75

    as in new window
    Handle: RePEc:aea:jecper:v:23:y:2009:i:2:p:53-75

    Note: DOI: 10.1257/jep.23.2.53
    Contact details of provider:
    Email:
    Web page: http://www.aeaweb.org/jep/
    More information through EDIRC

    Order Information:
    Web: http://www.aeaweb.org/subscribe.html

    Related research

    Keywords:

    Find related papers by JEL classification:

    References

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
    as in new window
    1. Krupnick, Alan J. & Burtraw, Dallas, 1996. "The social costs of electricity: Do the numbers add up?," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 423-466, December.
    2. Klaus S. Lackner & Jeffrey D. Sachs, 2005. "A Robust Strategy for Sustainable Energy," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 36(2), pages 215-284.
    3. Newell, Richard & Anderson, Soren, 2003. "Prospects for Carbon Capture and Storage Technologies," Discussion Papers dp-02-68, Resources For the Future.
    4. Mendelsohn, Robert & Dinar, Ariel & Williams, Larry, 2006. "The distributional impact of climate change on rich and poor countries," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 11(02), pages 159-178, April.
    5. David Keith & Minh Ha-Duong & Joshua Stolaroff, 2006. "Climate strategy with CO2 capture from the air," Post-Print halshs-00003926, HAL.
    6. Arrow Kenneth J. & Cohen Linda & David Paul A. & Hahn Robert W. & Kolstad Charles D. & Lane Lee & Montgomery W. David & Nelson Richard R. & Noll Roger G. & Smith Anne E., 2009. "A Statement on the Appropriate Role for Research and Development in Climate Policy," The Economists' Voice, De Gruyter, vol. 6(1), pages 1-4, February.
    7. repec:reg:wpaper:614 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Farrell, Alexander E. & Keith, David W. & Corbett, James J., 2003. "A strategy for introducing hydrogen into transportation," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(13), pages 1357-1367, October.
    9. DeCarolis, Joseph F. & Keith, David W., 2006. "The economics of large-scale wind power in a carbon constrained world," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 395-410, March.
    10. Scott Barrett, 2008. "The Incredible Economics of Geoengineering," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 39(1), pages 45-54, January.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as in new window

    Cited by:
    1. Johannes Urpelainen, 2013. "Can strategic technology development improve climate cooperation? A game-theoretic analysis," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 18(6), pages 785-800, August.
    2. Johannes Urpelainen, 2010. "Enforcing international environmental cooperation: Technological standards can help," The Review of International Organizations, Springer, vol. 5(4), pages 475-496, December.
    3. Wim Naudé, 2011. "Climate Change and Industrial Policy," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 3(7), pages 1003-1021, July.
    4. Gregor Schwerhoff, 2013. "Leadership and International Climate Cooperation," Working Papers 2013.97, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
    5. Kosnik, Lea, 2010. "The potential for small scale hydropower development in the US," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(10), pages 5512-5519, October.
    6. Alexandre Sauquet, 2014. "Exploring the nature of inter-country interactions in the process of ratifying international environmental agreements: the case of the Kyoto Protocol," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 159(1), pages 141-158, April.
    7. Johannes Urpelainen, 2013. "A model of dynamic climate governance: dream big, win small," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 13(2), pages 107-125, May.
    8. Urpelainen, Johannes, 2011. "Export orientation and domestic electricity generation: Effects on energy efficiency innovation in select sectors," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(9), pages 5638-5646, September.
    9. Rolf Färe & Shawna Grosskopf & Dimitri Margaritis & William Weber, 2012. "Technological change and timing reductions in greenhouse gas emissions," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 37(3), pages 205-216, June.
    10. Greene, D.L. & Boudreaux, P.R. & Dean, D.J. & Fulkerson, W. & Gaddis, A.L. & Graham, R.L. & Graves, R.L. & Hopson, J.L. & Hughes, P. & Lapsa, M.V. & Mason, T.E. & Standaert, R.F. & Wilbanks, T.J. & Zu, 2010. "The importance of advancing technology to America's energy goals," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(8), pages 3886-3890, August.
    11. Richard Cornes & Dirk Rübbelke, 2012. "On the Private Provision of Contentious Public Characteristics," CESifo Working Paper Series 3881, CESifo Group Munich.
    12. Cunha-e-Sá, Maria A. & Rosa, Renato & Costa-Duarte, Clara, 2013. "Natural carbon capture and storage (NCCS): Forests, land use and carbon accounting," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 148-170.
    13. Benjamin Jones & Michael Keen & Jon Strand, 2013. "Fiscal implications of climate change," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer, vol. 20(1), pages 29-70, February.
    14. Benchekroun, Hassan & Ray Chaudhuri, Amrita, 2014. "Transboundary pollution and clean technologies," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 601-619.
    15. Stokes, Leah C., 2013. "The politics of renewable energy policies: The case of feed-in tariffs in Ontario, Canada," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 490-500.
    16. Hoel, Michael & Jensen, Svenn, 2012. "Cutting costs of catching carbon—Intertemporal effects under imperfect climate policy," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 680-695.
    17. Johannes Pfeiffer & Luise Röpke & Jana Lippelt, 2010. "Kurz zum Klima: Pumpspeicherwerke – bewährte Technologie für eine grüne Zukunft?," Ifo Schnelldienst, Ifo Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 63(16), pages 44-46, 08.

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:aea:jecper:v:23:y:2009:i:2:p:53-75. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Jane Voros) or (Michael P. Albert).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.