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Data Watch: The American Time Use Survey

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  • Daniel S. Hamermesh
  • Harley Frazis
  • Jay Stewart

Abstract

We discuss the new American Time Use Survey (ATUS), an on-going household survey of roughly 1,200 Americans per month (1,800 per month in the first year, 2003) that collects time diaries as well as demographic interview information from respondents who had recently been in the Current Population Survey. The characteristics of the data are presented, as are caveats and concerns that one might have about them. A number of novel uses of the ATUS in economic research, including in the areas of macroeconomics, national income accounting, labor economics, and others, are proposed to illustrate the magnitude of this new survey's possible applications.

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File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/0895330053148029
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by American Economic Association in its journal Journal of Economic Perspectives.

Volume (Year): 19 (2005)
Issue (Month): 1 (Winter)
Pages: 221-232

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Handle: RePEc:aea:jecper:v:19:y:2005:i:1:p:221-232

Note: DOI: 10.1257/0895330053148029
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  1. Daniel S. Hamermesh & Jungmin Lee, 2003. "Stressed Out on Four Continents: Time Crunch or Yuppie Kvetch?," NBER Working Papers 10186, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Harley Frazis & Jay Stewart, 2007. "Where Does the Time Go? Concepts and Measurement in the American Time Use Survey," NBER Chapters, in: Hard-to-Measure Goods and Services: Essays in Honor of Zvi Griliches, pages 73-97 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Fahr, Rene, 2005. "Loafing or learning?--the demand for informal education," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 49(1), pages 75-98, January.
  4. repec:iza:izadps:858dp is not listed on IDEAS
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  1. Papers and articles using the American Time Use Survey (ATUS)

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