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Climate Change and Birth Weight

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  • Olivier Deschenes
  • Michael Greenstone
  • Jonathan Guryan

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File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/aer.99.2.211
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by American Economic Association in its journal American Economic Review.

Volume (Year): 99 (2009)
Issue (Month): 2 (May)
Pages: 211-17

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Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:99:y:2009:i:2:p:211-17

Note: DOI: 10.1257/aer.99.2.211
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References

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  1. Olivier Desch�nes & Michael Greenstone, 2011. "Climate Change, Mortality, and Adaptation: Evidence from Annual Fluctuations in Weather in the US," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 3(4), pages 152-85, October.
  2. Sandra E Black & Paul J Devereux & Kjell G Salvanes, 2007. "From the Cradle to the Labor Market? The Effect of Birth Weight on Adult Outcomes," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 122(1), pages 409-439, 02.
  3. repec:reg:wpaper:291 is not listed on IDEAS
  4. Heather Royer, 2009. "Separated at Girth: US Twin Estimates of the Effects of Birth Weight," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 1(1), pages 49-85, January.
  5. Richard Tol, 2002. "Estimates of the Damage Costs of Climate Change, Part II. Dynamic Estimates," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 21(2), pages 135-160, February.
  6. Olivier Desch�nes & Michael Greenstone, 2007. "The Economic Impacts of Climate Change: Evidence from Agricultural Output and Random Fluctuations in Weather," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(1), pages 354-385, March.
  7. Richard Tol, 2002. "Estimates of the Damage Costs of Climate Change. Part 1: Benchmark Estimates," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 21(1), pages 47-73, January.
  8. In Utero, 2006. "Is the 1918 Influenza Pandemic Over? Long-Term Effects of In Utero Influenza Exposure in the Post-1940 U.S. Population," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 114(4), pages 672-712, August.
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Cited by:
  1. Nicholas J. Sanders, 2011. "What Doesn't Kill you Makes you Weaker: Prenatal Pollution Exposure and Educational Outcomes," Discussion Papers 10-019, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.
  2. Ziebarth, N. R.; & Schmitt, M.; & Karlsson, M.;, 2013. "The short-term population health effects of weather and pollution: implications of climate change," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 13/34, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
  3. Melissa Dell & Benjamin F. Jones & Benjamin A. Olken, 2013. "What Do We Learn from the Weather? The New Climate-Economy Literature," NBER Working Papers 19578, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Rocha, Rudi & Soares, Rodrigo R., 2012. "Water Scarcity and Birth Outcomes in the Brazilian Semiarid," IZA Discussion Papers 6773, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. Wolfram Schlenker & W. Reed Walker, 2011. "Airports, Air Pollution, and Contemporaneous Health," NBER Working Papers 17684, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Christopher R. Knittel & Douglas L. Miller & Nicholas J. Sanders, 2011. "Caution, Drivers! Children Present: Traffic, Pollution, and Infant Health," NBER Working Papers 17222, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Carlson, Kyle, 2014. "Fear itself: The effects of distressing economic news on birth outcomes," MPRA Paper 56560, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  8. Christian Almer & Ralph Winkler, 2010. "Strategic behavior in IEAs: When and why countries joined the Kyoto Protocol," Diskussionsschriften dp1014, Universitaet Bern, Departement Volkswirtschaft.
  9. Henderson, J. Vernon & Storeygard, Adam & Deichmann, Uwe, 2014. "50 years of urbanization in Africa : examining the role of climate change," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6925, The World Bank.
  10. Michael Greenstone & B. Kelsey Jack, 2013. "Envirodevonomics: A Research Agenda for a Young Field," NBER Working Papers 19426, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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