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Strikes, Wages, and Private Information

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  • McConnell, Sheena
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    Abstract

    Private information models of strikes suggest that the strike is used as an information revealing device by the union in the presence of asymmetrical information. A testable prediction of these models is that there is a negative relationship between strikes and the unpredicted component of the wage. This paper finds evidence of such a relationship in a large sample of U.S. labor contracts. The real wage falls by about 3 percent after a strike lasting one hundred days. Copyright 1989 by American Economic Association.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by American Economic Association in its journal American Economic Review.

    Volume (Year): 79 (1989)
    Issue (Month): 4 (September)
    Pages: 801-15

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    Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:79:y:1989:i:4:p:801-15

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    Cited by:
    1. Linda Babcock & George Loewenstein, 1997. "Explaining Bargaining Impasse: The Role of Self-Serving Biases," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 11(1), pages 109-126, Winter.
    2. Michael Huberman & Denise Young, 1995. "What Did Unions Do... An Analysis of Canadian Strike Data, 1901-14," CIRANO Working Papers 95s-17, CIRANO.
    3. Peter Cramton & Joseph S. Tracy, 1992. "Strikes and Holdouts in Wage Bargaining: Theory and Data," Papers of Peter Cramton 92aer, University of Maryland, Department of Economics - Peter Cramton, revised 09 Jun 1998.
    4. Ashenfelter, O. & Currie, J. & Farber, H.S. & Spiegel, M., 1990. "An Experimental Comparison Of Dispute Rates In Alternative Arbitration Systems," Papers 55, Princeton, Woodrow Wilson School - Discussion Paper.
    5. Card, David & Olson, Craig A, 1995. "Bargaining Power, Strike Durations, and Wage Outcomes: An Analysis of Strikes in the 1880s," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 13(1), pages 32-61, January.
    6. Arturo Alegría & Fernando Coloma, 1992. "Huelga: Enfoques Teóricos, Análisis del Caso Chileno y Evidencia Internacional," Latin American Journal of Economics-formerly Cuadernos de Economía, Instituto de Economía. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile., vol. 29(86), pages 55-98.
    7. Fernando Coloma & Arturo Alegría, . "Huelga: Enfoques Teóricos y Efectos Económicos de Disfrutar Regulaciones," Documentos de Trabajo 141, Instituto de Economia. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile..
    8. Peter Cramton & Joseph S. Tracy, 1994. "The Determinants of U.S. Labor Disputes," Papers of Peter Cramton 94jole, University of Maryland, Department of Economics - Peter Cramton, revised 09 Jun 1998.
    9. Kennan, John, 1995. "Repeated contract negotiations with private information," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 7(4), pages 447-472, November.
    10. Lemke, Robert J., 2004. "Dynamic bargaining with action-dependent valuations," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 28(9), pages 1847-1875, July.
    11. Peter Cramton & Joseph Tracy, 2003. "Unions, Bargaining and Strikes," Papers of Peter Cramton 02ubs, University of Maryland, Department of Economics - Peter Cramton, revised 05 Sep 2002.
    12. repec:fth:prinin:267 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Farmer, Amy & Tiefenthaler, Jill, 2001. "Conflict in divorce disputes: the determinants of pretrial settlement," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(2), pages 157-180, June.
    14. Varoufakis, Yanis, 1996. "Bargaining and strikes: Towards an evolutionary framework," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 3(4), pages 385-398, December.

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