Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Black-White Differences in Returns to Schooling

Contents:

Author Info

  • Welch, Finis
Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    No abstract is available for this item.

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0002-8282%28197312%2963%3A5%3C893%3ABDIRTS%3E2.0.CO%3B2-1&origin=repec
    File Function: full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to JSTOR subscribers. See http://www.jstor.org for details.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by American Economic Association in its journal American Economic Review.

    Volume (Year): 63 (1973)
    Issue (Month): 5 (December)
    Pages: 893-907

    as in new window
    Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:63:y:1973:i:5:p:893-907

    Contact details of provider:
    Email:
    Web page: http://www.aeaweb.org/aer/
    More information through EDIRC

    Order Information:
    Web: http://www.aeaweb.org/subscribe.html

    Related research

    Keywords:

    References

    No references listed on IDEAS
    You can help add them by filling out this form.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as in new window

    Cited by:
    1. Adriana Lleras-Muney, 2001. "Were Compulsory Attendance and Child Labor Laws Effective? An Analysis from 1915 to 1939," NBER Working Papers 8563, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Stephen Nord, 1983. "An Interstate Analysis of Changes in Nonwhite and White Family Incomes 1960 to 1970," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 9(1), pages 13-21, Jan-Mar.
    3. Jacob L. Vigdor, 2006. "The New Promised Land: Black-White Convergence in the American South, 1960-2000," NBER Working Papers 12143, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Bertocchi, Graziella & Dimico, Arcangelo, 2011. "The Evolution of the Racial Gap in Education and the Legacy of Slavery," IZA Discussion Papers 6192, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. James J. Heckman & Brook S. Payner, 1989. "Determining the Impact of Federal Antidiscrimination Policy on the Economic Status of Blacks: A Study of South Carolina," NBER Working Papers 2854, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Weiss, Yoram & Lillard, Lee A, 1978. "Experience, Vintage, and Time Effects in the Growth of Earnings: American Scientists, 1960-1970," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 86(3), pages 427-47, June.
    7. Edward N. Wolff & Dennis M. Bushe, 1976. "Age, Education and Occupational Earnings Inequality," NBER Working Papers 0149, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Carnoy, Martin, 1996. "Race, gender, and the role of education in earnings inequality: An introduction," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 15(3), pages 207-212, June.
    9. Cebula, Richard, 1973. "Interstate Migration and the Tiebout Hypothesis: An Analysis According to Race, Sex, and Age," MPRA Paper 49827, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 01 Feb 1974.
    10. Richard B. Freeman, 1980. "The Evolution of the American Labor Market 1948-1980," NBER Working Papers 0446, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Muhammad Sabir & Zehra Aftab, 2007. "Dynamism in the Gender Wage Gap: Evidence from Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 46(4), pages 865-882.
    12. Edward P. Lazear, 1977. "Wage Differentials Are Larger Than You Think," NBER Working Papers 0168, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. repec:mod:depeco:0001 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Richard Butler & James J. Heckman, 1977. "The Government's Impact on the Labor Market Status of Black Americans: A Critical Review," NBER Working Papers 0183, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    15. Bertocchi, Graziella & Dimico, Arcangelo, 2012. "The racial gap in education and the legacy of slavery," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(4), pages 581-595.
    16. Ken Cavalluzzo & Linda Cavalluzzo & John Wolken, 1999. "Competition, small business financing, and discrimination: evidence from a new survey," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 1999-25, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:63:y:1973:i:5:p:893-907. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Jane Voros) or (Michael P. Albert).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.