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Boys' Cognitive Skill Formation and Physical Growth: Long-Term Experimental Evidence on Critical Ages for Early Childhood Interventions

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  • Tania Barham
  • Karen Macours
  • John A. Maluccio

Abstract

It is often assumed that early life circumstances, in particular before age two, are important for later human capital development. Using experimental variation in the timing of benefits from a conditional cash transfer program, we test the hypothesis that intervention starting in utero and continuing in the first two years is critical. At age ten, boys exposed to the program during this period had better cognitive, but not anthropometric, outcomes than those exposed in their second year of life or later. The lack of a differential effect on anthropometrics was due catch-up growth.

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File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/aer.103.3.467
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by American Economic Association in its journal American Economic Review.

Volume (Year): 103 (2013)
Issue (Month): 3 (May)
Pages: 467-71

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Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:103:y:2013:i:3:p:467-71

Note: DOI: 10.1257/aer.103.3.467
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Cited by:
  1. Emla Fitzsimons & Marcos Vera-Hernández, 2014. "Food for Thought? Breastfeeding and Child Development," DoQSS Working Papers 14-04, Department of Quantitative Social Science - Institute of Education, University of London.
  2. Emla Fitzsimons & Marcos Vera-Hernandez, 2013. "Food for Thought? Breastfeeding and Child Development," IFS Working Papers W13/31, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  3. Hoyt Bleakley & Dora Costa & Adriana Lleras-Muney, 2013. "Health, Education and Income in the United States, 1820-2000," NBER Working Papers 19162, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Dora Costa, 2013. "Health and the Economy in the United States, from 1750 to the Present," NBER Working Papers 19685, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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