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The Weight of History on European Cultural Integration: A Gravity Approach

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  • Pauline Grosjean

Abstract

The cultural gravity model proposed in this paper uses micro-level survey data of 21,000 households to estimate the contribution to cultural heterogeneity of a long history of division between the Ottoman, Habsburg, Russian or Prussian Empires since the year 1300 in 21 European countries. By exploiting the variation in the duration of integration of localities in different empires, this paper sheds light on the influence of political integration on cultural integration and on the rate of cultural change. History matters and cultural values change very slowly: long lasting effects on social trust comes after 400 years of common imperial rule.

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File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/aer.101.3.504
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by American Economic Association in its journal American Economic Review.

Volume (Year): 101 (2011)
Issue (Month): 3 (May)
Pages: 504-08

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Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:101:y:2011:i:3:p:504-08

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References

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  1. Ashraf, Quamrul & Galor, Oded, 2007. "Cultural Assimilation, Cultural Diffusion and the Origin of the Wealth of Nations," CEPR Discussion Papers 6444, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. repec:spo:wpecon:info:hdl:2441/eu4vqp9ompqllr09iatsh0to2 is not listed on IDEAS
  3. McCleary, Rachel & Barro, Robert, 2003. "Religion and Economic Growth across Countries," Scholarly Articles 3708464, Harvard University Department of Economics.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Franz R. Hahn, 2012. "Culture, Geography and Institutions. Empirical Evidence from Small-scale Banking," WIFO Working Papers 417, WIFO.
  2. Becker, Sascha O. & Boeckh, Katrin & Hainz, Christa & Woessmann, Ludger, 2011. "The Empire Is Dead, Long Live the Empire! Long-Run Persistence of Trust and Corruption in the Bureaucracy," IZA Discussion Papers 5584, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Grosfeld, Irena & Zhuravskaya, Ekaterina, 2013. "Persistent effects of empires: Evidence from the partitions of Poland," CEPR Discussion Papers 9371, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  4. Nunn, Nathan, 2014. "Historical Development," Handbook of Economic Growth, in: Handbook of Economic Growth, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 7, pages 347-402 Elsevier.
  5. Dimitrova-Grajzl, Valentina & Grajzl, Peter & Guse, A. Joseph, 2012. "Trust, perceptions of corruption, and demand for regulation: Evidence from post-socialist countries," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 41(3), pages 292-303.
  6. Alessandra Cassar & Giovanna d'Adda & Pauline Grosjean, 2013. "Institutional Quality, Culture, and Norms of Cooperation: Evidence from a Behavioral Field Experiment," Discussion Papers 2013-10, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.
  7. Andrea Caragliu & Chiara Del Bo & Henri Groot & Gert-Jan Linders, 2013. "Cultural determinants of migration," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer, vol. 51(1), pages 7-32, August.
  8. Roman Horváth, 2012. "Does Trust Promote Growth?," Working Papers IES 2012/09, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, revised Apr 2012.
  9. Dabalen, Andrew & Parinduri, Rasyad & Paul, Saumik, 2014. "The effects of the intensity, timing, and persistence of personal history of mobility on support for redistribution," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6803, The World Bank.
  10. repec:cge:warwcg:40 is not listed on IDEAS
  11. repec:hal:wpaper:halshs-00795231 is not listed on IDEAS

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